Dewatering methanotrophic enrichments intended for single cell protein production using biomimetic aquaporin forward osmosis membranes

Borja Valverde Pérez, Mathias L. Pape, Astrid Friborg Kjeldgaard, August A. Zachariae, Carina Schneider, Claus Hélix-Nielsen, Agata Zarebska, Barth F. Smets*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Microbial biomass is becoming an alternative source of protein, especially for application in animal feeds formulations. While much progress has been made in biomass cultivation, harvesting after cultivation remains a very costly part of the overall process. This study investigated low-cost forward osmosis for dewatering methanotrophic cultures using biomimetic aquaporin membranes. Brine and glycerol were used as draw solutions as they are available as inexpensive industrial byproducts. NaCl and MgCl2 were also used to better understand the behavior of brine. With NaCl and brine the highest water fluxes were obtained, but ammonium retention was low and high reverse salt fluxes were measured. With MgCl2, the highest specific water flux (Jw/Js = 7.5 ± 1.7 L g−1) and a good ammonium retention (~85%) was obtained. Thus, only brines with high content on MgCl2 should be considered for FO applications. With glycerol as draw solution, the solute back flux was the highest without affecting microbial growth or methane yields. Hence it shows potential as good draw solution, if available as residual stream. Surprisingly there was no significant difference in water fluxes at the different osmotic pressures (30 and 60 atm). Noteworthy biofouling did not affect the water fluxes, except the case when NaCl at 60 atm was used as draw solution. Overall, this study demonstrates that forward osmosis is a feasible technology for harvesting methanotrophic biomass.
Original languageEnglish
Article number116133
JournalSeparation and Purification Technology
Volume235
Number of pages8
ISSN1383-5866
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Forward osmosis
  • Biomimetic aquaporin membranes
  • Microbial protein
  • Water treatment
  • Resource recovery

Cite this

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title = "Dewatering methanotrophic enrichments intended for single cell protein production using biomimetic aquaporin forward osmosis membranes",
abstract = "Microbial biomass is becoming an alternative source of protein, especially for application in animal feeds formulations. While much progress has been made in biomass cultivation, harvesting after cultivation remains a very costly part of the overall process. This study investigated low-cost forward osmosis for dewatering methanotrophic cultures using biomimetic aquaporin membranes. Brine and glycerol were used as draw solutions as they are available as inexpensive industrial byproducts. NaCl and MgCl2 were also used to better understand the behavior of brine. With NaCl and brine the highest water fluxes were obtained, but ammonium retention was low and high reverse salt fluxes were measured. With MgCl2, the highest specific water flux (Jw/Js = 7.5 ± 1.7 L g−1) and a good ammonium retention (~85{\%}) was obtained. Thus, only brines with high content on MgCl2 should be considered for FO applications. With glycerol as draw solution, the solute back flux was the highest without affecting microbial growth or methane yields. Hence it shows potential as good draw solution, if available as residual stream. Surprisingly there was no significant difference in water fluxes at the different osmotic pressures (30 and 60 atm). Noteworthy biofouling did not affect the water fluxes, except the case when NaCl at 60 atm was used as draw solution. Overall, this study demonstrates that forward osmosis is a feasible technology for harvesting methanotrophic biomass.",
keywords = "Forward osmosis, Biomimetic aquaporin membranes, Microbial protein, Water treatment, Resource recovery",
author = "{Valverde P{\'e}rez}, Borja and Pape, {Mathias L.} and Kjeldgaard, {Astrid Friborg} and Zachariae, {August A.} and Carina Schneider and Claus H{\'e}lix-Nielsen and Agata Zarebska and Smets, {Barth F.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.seppur.2019.116133",
language = "English",
volume = "235",
journal = "Separation and Purification Technology",
issn = "1383-5866",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

}

Dewatering methanotrophic enrichments intended for single cell protein production using biomimetic aquaporin forward osmosis membranes. / Valverde Pérez, Borja; Pape, Mathias L.; Kjeldgaard, Astrid Friborg; Zachariae, August A.; Schneider, Carina; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus; Zarebska, Agata; Smets, Barth F.

In: Separation and Purification Technology, Vol. 235, 116133, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dewatering methanotrophic enrichments intended for single cell protein production using biomimetic aquaporin forward osmosis membranes

AU - Valverde Pérez, Borja

AU - Pape, Mathias L.

AU - Kjeldgaard, Astrid Friborg

AU - Zachariae, August A.

AU - Schneider, Carina

AU - Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

AU - Zarebska, Agata

AU - Smets, Barth F.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Microbial biomass is becoming an alternative source of protein, especially for application in animal feeds formulations. While much progress has been made in biomass cultivation, harvesting after cultivation remains a very costly part of the overall process. This study investigated low-cost forward osmosis for dewatering methanotrophic cultures using biomimetic aquaporin membranes. Brine and glycerol were used as draw solutions as they are available as inexpensive industrial byproducts. NaCl and MgCl2 were also used to better understand the behavior of brine. With NaCl and brine the highest water fluxes were obtained, but ammonium retention was low and high reverse salt fluxes were measured. With MgCl2, the highest specific water flux (Jw/Js = 7.5 ± 1.7 L g−1) and a good ammonium retention (~85%) was obtained. Thus, only brines with high content on MgCl2 should be considered for FO applications. With glycerol as draw solution, the solute back flux was the highest without affecting microbial growth or methane yields. Hence it shows potential as good draw solution, if available as residual stream. Surprisingly there was no significant difference in water fluxes at the different osmotic pressures (30 and 60 atm). Noteworthy biofouling did not affect the water fluxes, except the case when NaCl at 60 atm was used as draw solution. Overall, this study demonstrates that forward osmosis is a feasible technology for harvesting methanotrophic biomass.

AB - Microbial biomass is becoming an alternative source of protein, especially for application in animal feeds formulations. While much progress has been made in biomass cultivation, harvesting after cultivation remains a very costly part of the overall process. This study investigated low-cost forward osmosis for dewatering methanotrophic cultures using biomimetic aquaporin membranes. Brine and glycerol were used as draw solutions as they are available as inexpensive industrial byproducts. NaCl and MgCl2 were also used to better understand the behavior of brine. With NaCl and brine the highest water fluxes were obtained, but ammonium retention was low and high reverse salt fluxes were measured. With MgCl2, the highest specific water flux (Jw/Js = 7.5 ± 1.7 L g−1) and a good ammonium retention (~85%) was obtained. Thus, only brines with high content on MgCl2 should be considered for FO applications. With glycerol as draw solution, the solute back flux was the highest without affecting microbial growth or methane yields. Hence it shows potential as good draw solution, if available as residual stream. Surprisingly there was no significant difference in water fluxes at the different osmotic pressures (30 and 60 atm). Noteworthy biofouling did not affect the water fluxes, except the case when NaCl at 60 atm was used as draw solution. Overall, this study demonstrates that forward osmosis is a feasible technology for harvesting methanotrophic biomass.

KW - Forward osmosis

KW - Biomimetic aquaporin membranes

KW - Microbial protein

KW - Water treatment

KW - Resource recovery

U2 - 10.1016/j.seppur.2019.116133

DO - 10.1016/j.seppur.2019.116133

M3 - Journal article

VL - 235

JO - Separation and Purification Technology

JF - Separation and Purification Technology

SN - 1383-5866

M1 - 116133

ER -