Danish children born to parents with lower levels of education are more likely to become overweight

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2014Researchpeer-review

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AIM:
Little is known about whether the socio-economic status of parents is linked to their children becoming overweight. This study examined the association between parents' educational level and overweight Danish children in a nationally representative sample.
METHODS:
Body mass index was calculated for a random sample of 512 children aged from four to 14 from the Danish National Survey of Diet and Physical Activity 2005-2008. Their parents provided weight and height data during an interview, together with details of their own educational level. Children were classified as overweight/obese in accordance with the International Obesity Task Force. Frequency estimates of prevalence and logistic regression models were used to correlate childhood overweight/obesity with the mothers' and fathers' educational levels as the main outcome measures.
RESULTS:
Danish mothers tended to be more highly educated than fathers and their educational level was inversely associated with their child being overweight, especially if it was a boy. However, the highest educational level of the parents was the only significant educational variable, suggesting that education was associated with overweight children irrespective of the gender of the parent.
CONCLUSION:
Public health initiatives should target parents with low educational levels to prevent, and reduce, social inequality in overweight children.
Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Paediatrica
Volume103
Issue number10
Pages (from-to)1083-1088
Number of pages6
ISSN0803-5253
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: No match on DOI

    Research areas

  • Childhood obesity, Scandinavia, Maternal education, Paternal education, Socio-economic status

Activities

ID: 97206391