Ctenophore population recruits entirely through larval reproduction in the central Baltic Sea

Cornelia Jaspers, Matilda Haraldsson, Sören Bolte, Thorsten B.H. Reusch, Uffe Høgsbro Thygesen, Thomas Kiørboe

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Featured as research highlight in Nature. The comb jelly Mertensia ovum, widely distributed in Arctic regions, has recently been discovered in the northern Baltic Sea. We show that M. ovum also exists in the central Baltic but that the population consists solely of small-sized larvae (less than 1.6 mm). Despite the absence of adults, eggs were abundant. Experiments revealed that the larvae were reproductively active. Egg production and anticipated mortality rates suggest a self-sustaining population. This is the first account of a ctenophore population entirely recruiting through larval reproduction (paedogenesis). We hypothesize that early reproduction is favoured over growth to compensate for high predation pressure

Original languageEnglish
JournalBiology Letters
Volume8
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)809-812
ISSN1744-9561
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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title = "Ctenophore population recruits entirely through larval reproduction in the central Baltic Sea",
abstract = "Featured as research highlight in Nature. The comb jelly Mertensia ovum, widely distributed in Arctic regions, has recently been discovered in the northern Baltic Sea. We show that M. ovum also exists in the central Baltic but that the population consists solely of small-sized larvae (less than 1.6 mm). Despite the absence of adults, eggs were abundant. Experiments revealed that the larvae were reproductively active. Egg production and anticipated mortality rates suggest a self-sustaining population. This is the first account of a ctenophore population entirely recruiting through larval reproduction (paedogenesis). We hypothesize that early reproduction is favoured over growth to compensate for high predation pressure",
author = "Cornelia Jaspers and Matilda Haraldsson and S{\"o}ren Bolte and Reusch, {Thorsten B.H.} and Thygesen, {Uffe H{\o}gsbro} and Thomas Ki{\o}rboe",
year = "2012",
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Ctenophore population recruits entirely through larval reproduction in the central Baltic Sea. / Jaspers, Cornelia; Haraldsson, Matilda; Bolte, Sören; Reusch, Thorsten B.H.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Kiørboe, Thomas.

In: Biology Letters, Vol. 8, No. 5, 2012, p. 809-812.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ctenophore population recruits entirely through larval reproduction in the central Baltic Sea

AU - Jaspers, Cornelia

AU - Haraldsson, Matilda

AU - Bolte, Sören

AU - Reusch, Thorsten B.H.

AU - Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

AU - Kiørboe, Thomas

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Featured as research highlight in Nature. The comb jelly Mertensia ovum, widely distributed in Arctic regions, has recently been discovered in the northern Baltic Sea. We show that M. ovum also exists in the central Baltic but that the population consists solely of small-sized larvae (less than 1.6 mm). Despite the absence of adults, eggs were abundant. Experiments revealed that the larvae were reproductively active. Egg production and anticipated mortality rates suggest a self-sustaining population. This is the first account of a ctenophore population entirely recruiting through larval reproduction (paedogenesis). We hypothesize that early reproduction is favoured over growth to compensate for high predation pressure

AB - Featured as research highlight in Nature. The comb jelly Mertensia ovum, widely distributed in Arctic regions, has recently been discovered in the northern Baltic Sea. We show that M. ovum also exists in the central Baltic but that the population consists solely of small-sized larvae (less than 1.6 mm). Despite the absence of adults, eggs were abundant. Experiments revealed that the larvae were reproductively active. Egg production and anticipated mortality rates suggest a self-sustaining population. This is the first account of a ctenophore population entirely recruiting through larval reproduction (paedogenesis). We hypothesize that early reproduction is favoured over growth to compensate for high predation pressure

U2 - 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0163

DO - 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0163

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 809

EP - 812

JO - Biology Letters

JF - Biology Letters

SN - 1744-9561

IS - 5

ER -