CO2 in aquaculture

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aquaculture of fishes is increasingly using recirculation technology to conserve water and reduce the environmental footprint from production. Recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) require an intensification of production, which gives rise to a number of water quality issues that must be considered, including the accumulation of carbon dioxide (CO2). This chapter provides an initial overview on the excretion of CO2 from fish and bacterial metabolism, before discussing what is currently being considered as safe levels, or levels of no-effect, of dissolved CO2 for fish, highlighting some differences between aquaculture and ecological studies. The correlation between alkalinity and pH, and the chemical form of CO2 is briefly covered, before providing an overview of current removal practices and technologies. The chapter provides an overview of the physiological effects of CO2 in relation to aquaculture production, specifically feed intake, appetite, digestive function and growth, before considering the effects of CO2 exposure on the ability of fish to migrate from fresh to seawater, in light of structural and functional changes in the gills. Finally, some pathologies associated with CO2 exposure, such as nephrocalcinosis and eye cataracts are highlighted, before closing with an overview of interacting effects between CO2 and other water quality variables, such as hypoxia or dissolved metals.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCarbon Dioxide
EditorsMartin Grosell, Philip L. Munday, Anthony P. Farrell, Colin J. Brauner
Volume37
PublisherElsevier
Publication date2019
Pages287-321
Chapter8
ISBN (Electronic)978-0-12-817609-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
SeriesFish Physiology
ISSN1546-5098

Keywords

  • Aquaculture
  • Welfare
  • Growth
  • Feed conversion
  • Cataracts
  • Water quality
  • pH

Cite this

Skov, P. V. (2019). CO2 in aquaculture. In M. Grosell, P. L. Munday, A. P. Farrell, & C. J. Brauner (Eds.), Carbon Dioxide (Vol. 37, pp. 287-321). Elsevier. Fish Physiology https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.fp.2019.07.004
Skov, Peter Vilhelm. / CO2 in aquaculture. Carbon Dioxide. editor / Martin Grosell ; Philip L. Munday ; Anthony P. Farrell ; Colin J. Brauner. Vol. 37 Elsevier, 2019. pp. 287-321 (Fish Physiology).
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Skov, PV 2019, CO2 in aquaculture. in M Grosell, PL Munday, AP Farrell & CJ Brauner (eds), Carbon Dioxide. vol. 37, Elsevier, Fish Physiology, pp. 287-321. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.fp.2019.07.004

CO2 in aquaculture. / Skov, Peter Vilhelm.

Carbon Dioxide. ed. / Martin Grosell; Philip L. Munday; Anthony P. Farrell; Colin J. Brauner. Vol. 37 Elsevier, 2019. p. 287-321 (Fish Physiology).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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Skov PV. CO2 in aquaculture. In Grosell M, Munday PL, Farrell AP, Brauner CJ, editors, Carbon Dioxide. Vol. 37. Elsevier. 2019. p. 287-321. (Fish Physiology). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.fp.2019.07.004