Cost-Effectiveness of a New Nordic Diet as a Strategy for Health Promotion

Jørgen Dejgård Jensen, Henrik Saxe, Sigrid Denver

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    Abstract

    Inappropriate diets constitute an important health risk and an increasing environmental burden. Healthy regional diets may contribute to meeting this dual challenge. A palatable, healthy and sustainable New Nordic diet (NND) based on organic products from the Nordic region has been developed. This study assesses whether a large-scale introduction of NND is a cost-effective health promotion strategy by combining an economic model for estimating the utility-maximizing composition of NND, a life cycle assessment model to assess environmental effects of the dietary change, and a health impact model to assess impacts on the disease burden. Consumer expenditure for food and beverages in the NND is about 16% higher than currently, with the largest relative difference in low-income households. Environmental loads from food consumption are 15%–25% lower, and more than 18,000 disability-adjusted life years (DALY) will be saved per year in Denmark. NND exhibits a cost-effectiveness ratio of about €73,000–94,000 per DALY saved. This cost-effectiveness improves considerably, if the NND’s emphasis on organic and Nordic-origin products is relaxed.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume12
    Issue number7
    Pages (from-to)7370-7391
    Number of pages22
    ISSN1661-7827
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Keywords

    • New Nordic Diet
    • Environmental impact
    • Public health
    • Cost-effectiveness

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