Contribution of the water weakening effect to plastic strain: Case studies from Danish North Sea chalk fields

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Abstract

The experimental studies highlighting the strength weakening of chalk when water replaces oil in pore space have incited geomodellers to systematically solve for the effect of water saturation on chalk strength at each simulation step to estimate reservoir compaction. The present study demonstrates quantitatively for the first time the important role played by the water weakening effect on the deformation of several producing fields in the Danish North Sea. Although non-negligible, the water weakening effect in the studied fields is caused by the initial water saturation of chalk rather than by its changes through time. Representative of numerous Danish North Sea reservoirs, the outcome of this study suggests that a preliminary assessment of the potential magnitude of the water weakening effect during production should be first performed prior to compaction simulation. If considered negligible, the adjustment of the rock strength according to the saturation conditions at each simulation step can be ignored, thereby reducing the computing time required to perform coupled geomechanical and fluid flow modelling.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the the 56th U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium
Number of pages7
PublisherAmerican Rock Mechanics Association (ARMA)
Publication date2022
Article numberARMA-2022-0379
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Event56th US Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium - Santa Fe, United States
Duration: 26 Jun 202229 Jun 2022
Conference number: 56

Conference

Conference56th US Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium
Number56
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySanta Fe
Period26/06/202229/06/2022

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