Comparison of level discrimination, increment detection, and comodulation masking release in the audio- and envelope-frequency domains

Paul C. Nelson, Stephan Ewert, Laurel H. Carney, Torsten Dau

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Abstract

In general, the temporal structure of stimuli must be considered to account for certain observations made in detection and masking experiments in the audio-frequency domain. Two such phenomena are (1) a heightened sensitivity to amplitude increments with a temporal fringe compared to gated level discrimination performance and (2) lower tone-in-noise detection thresholds using a modulated masker compared to those using an unmodulated masker. In the current study, translations of these two experiments were carried out to test the hypothesis that analogous cues might be used in the envelope-frequency domain. Pure-tone carrier amplitude-modulation (AM) depth-discrimination thresholds were found to be similar using both traditional gated stimuli and using a temporally modulated fringe for a fixed standard depth (ms=0.25) and a range of AM frequencies (4-64 Hz). In a second experiment, masked sinusoidal AM detection thresholds were compared in conditions with and without slow and regular fluctuations imposed on the instantaneous masker AM depth. Release from masking was obtained only for very slow masker fluctuations (less than 2 Hz). A physiologically motivated model that effectively acts as a first-order envelope change detector accounted for several, but not all, of the key aspects of the data
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume121
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)2168-2181
ISSN0001-4966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Bibliographical note

Copyright (2007) Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

Keywords

  • hearing

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