Combining self-reported and sensor data to explore the relationship between fuel poverty and health well-being in UK social housing

Gengyang Tu*, Karyn Morrissey, Richard A. Sharpe, Tim Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

28 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Linking novel real-time sensor data with comprehensive individual baseline survey data, this study estimates the effect of fuel poverty on the physical and mental health of social housing tenants in the southwest of the UK. Structural equation modeling is applied to show that fuel poverty has a significant negative effect on mental health. Other socio-economic characteristics (such as age, household size) and house characteristics (e.g., energy-efficient rating, house type) are associated with fuel poverty. Fuel poverty is also related to poorer mobility. Our results suggest that special attention should be paid to tenants with disabilities and chronic diseases since they are more vulnerable to fuel poverty and health issues.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100070
JournalWellbeing, Space and Society
Volume3
Number of pages9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study is in the frame of the Smartline project and Smartline extension project (www.smartline.org.uk) which are funded by the England European Regional Development Fund (Grant Nos. 05R16P00305, 05R18P02819) as part of the European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Programme 2014?2020. The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (and in London the intermediate body Greater London Authority) is the Managing Authority for the European Regional Development Fund. Established by the European Union, the European Regional Development Fund helps local areas stimulate their economic development by investing in projects which will support innovation and businesses, and create jobs and local community regenerations. For more information, visit https://www.gov.uk/european-growth-funding. The Smartline project is also funded by the South West Academic Health Science Network, Cornwall Council and HM Government, and is in a partnership between the University of Exeter, Coastline Housing, Volunteer Cornwall, Cornwall Council and the South West Academic Health Science Network. The authors are grateful to the whole Smartline team who helped with the collection of the survey data and administration of the project, particularly Andrew James Williams for his efforts in managing the survey design process, and to two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.

Funding Information:
This study is in the frame of the Smartline project and Smartline extension project ( www.smartline.org.uk ) which are funded by the England European Regional Development Fund (Grant Nos. 05R16P00305, 05R18P02819) as part of the European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Programme 2014–2020. The Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (and in London the intermediate body Greater London Authority) is the Managing Authority for the European Regional Development Fund. Established by the European Union, the European Regional Development Fund helps local areas stimulate their economic development by investing in projects which will support innovation and businesses, and create jobs and local community regenerations. For more information, visit https://www.gov.uk/european-growth-funding . The Smartline project is also funded by the South West Academic Health Science Network, Cornwall Council and HM Government, and is in a partnership between the University of Exeter, Coastline Housing, Volunteer Cornwall, Cornwall Council and the South West Academic Health Science Network. The authors are grateful to the whole Smartline team who helped with the collection of the survey data and administration of the project, particularly Andrew James Williams for his efforts in managing the survey design process, and to two anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Combining self-reported and sensor data to explore the relationship between fuel poverty and health well-being in UK social housing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this