Characteristics of misreporters of dietary intake and physical activity

Lone Banke Rasmussen, Jeppe Matthiessen, Anja Pia Biltoft-Jensen, Inge Tetens

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To characterise misreporters of energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE). Design: Cross-sectional study, using a validated position and motion instrument, ActiReg (R) as the reference method to study misreporters of El and of EE. El was measured using a dietary record and EE using a physical activity questionnaire (PAQ). Misreporters were defined as subjects outside the 95% confidence limits of agreement between El or EE reported/EE measured. Setting: Free-living Danish volunteers. Subjects: One hundred and thirty-eight volunteers aged between 20 and 59 years. Results: Body mass index, smoking, 'try to eat healthily' and worries about weight were related to degree of under-reported El. The percentage energy from added sugar was lowest (P <0.001) and the percentage energy from protein (P <0.001) highest in under-reporters compared with acceptable reporters. Subjects who reported being very physically active at work or in leisure time reported a higher EE than measured EE compared with less physically active subjects (P <0.05). Likewise, subjects who regard themselves as fit or very fit reported a higher EE than subjects who regard themselves as moderately fit (P <0.05). Possible over-reporters reported less time as very light activity (P = 0.007), more time as moderate activity (P = 0.01) and more time as vigorous activity (P = 0.02) than acceptable reporters. Conclusions: Under-reporting of El should always be taken into consideration; however, only a few characteristics of under-reporters are consistent among studies. Misreporting of El was more prevalent than misreporting of EE. The level of physical activity more than the time spent involved in various activities was misreported.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume10
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)230-237
ISSN1368-9800
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • energy intake
  • misreporting
  • physical activity
  • energy expenditure
  • dietary records

Cite this

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title = "Characteristics of misreporters of dietary intake and physical activity",
abstract = "Objective: To characterise misreporters of energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE). Design: Cross-sectional study, using a validated position and motion instrument, ActiReg (R) as the reference method to study misreporters of El and of EE. El was measured using a dietary record and EE using a physical activity questionnaire (PAQ). Misreporters were defined as subjects outside the 95{\%} confidence limits of agreement between El or EE reported/EE measured. Setting: Free-living Danish volunteers. Subjects: One hundred and thirty-eight volunteers aged between 20 and 59 years. Results: Body mass index, smoking, 'try to eat healthily' and worries about weight were related to degree of under-reported El. The percentage energy from added sugar was lowest (P <0.001) and the percentage energy from protein (P <0.001) highest in under-reporters compared with acceptable reporters. Subjects who reported being very physically active at work or in leisure time reported a higher EE than measured EE compared with less physically active subjects (P <0.05). Likewise, subjects who regard themselves as fit or very fit reported a higher EE than subjects who regard themselves as moderately fit (P <0.05). Possible over-reporters reported less time as very light activity (P = 0.007), more time as moderate activity (P = 0.01) and more time as vigorous activity (P = 0.02) than acceptable reporters. Conclusions: Under-reporting of El should always be taken into consideration; however, only a few characteristics of under-reporters are consistent among studies. Misreporting of El was more prevalent than misreporting of EE. The level of physical activity more than the time spent involved in various activities was misreported.",
keywords = "energy intake, misreporting, physical activity, energy expenditure, dietary records",
author = "Rasmussen, {Lone Banke} and Jeppe Matthiessen and Biltoft-Jensen, {Anja Pia} and Inge Tetens",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1017/S136898000724666X",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "230--237",
journal = "Public Health Nutrition",
issn = "1368-9800",
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}

Characteristics of misreporters of dietary intake and physical activity. / Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Matthiessen, Jeppe; Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Tetens, Inge.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 10, No. 3, 2007, p. 230-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Characteristics of misreporters of dietary intake and physical activity

AU - Rasmussen, Lone Banke

AU - Matthiessen, Jeppe

AU - Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia

AU - Tetens, Inge

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Objective: To characterise misreporters of energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE). Design: Cross-sectional study, using a validated position and motion instrument, ActiReg (R) as the reference method to study misreporters of El and of EE. El was measured using a dietary record and EE using a physical activity questionnaire (PAQ). Misreporters were defined as subjects outside the 95% confidence limits of agreement between El or EE reported/EE measured. Setting: Free-living Danish volunteers. Subjects: One hundred and thirty-eight volunteers aged between 20 and 59 years. Results: Body mass index, smoking, 'try to eat healthily' and worries about weight were related to degree of under-reported El. The percentage energy from added sugar was lowest (P <0.001) and the percentage energy from protein (P <0.001) highest in under-reporters compared with acceptable reporters. Subjects who reported being very physically active at work or in leisure time reported a higher EE than measured EE compared with less physically active subjects (P <0.05). Likewise, subjects who regard themselves as fit or very fit reported a higher EE than subjects who regard themselves as moderately fit (P <0.05). Possible over-reporters reported less time as very light activity (P = 0.007), more time as moderate activity (P = 0.01) and more time as vigorous activity (P = 0.02) than acceptable reporters. Conclusions: Under-reporting of El should always be taken into consideration; however, only a few characteristics of under-reporters are consistent among studies. Misreporting of El was more prevalent than misreporting of EE. The level of physical activity more than the time spent involved in various activities was misreported.

AB - Objective: To characterise misreporters of energy intake (EI) and energy expenditure (EE). Design: Cross-sectional study, using a validated position and motion instrument, ActiReg (R) as the reference method to study misreporters of El and of EE. El was measured using a dietary record and EE using a physical activity questionnaire (PAQ). Misreporters were defined as subjects outside the 95% confidence limits of agreement between El or EE reported/EE measured. Setting: Free-living Danish volunteers. Subjects: One hundred and thirty-eight volunteers aged between 20 and 59 years. Results: Body mass index, smoking, 'try to eat healthily' and worries about weight were related to degree of under-reported El. The percentage energy from added sugar was lowest (P <0.001) and the percentage energy from protein (P <0.001) highest in under-reporters compared with acceptable reporters. Subjects who reported being very physically active at work or in leisure time reported a higher EE than measured EE compared with less physically active subjects (P <0.05). Likewise, subjects who regard themselves as fit or very fit reported a higher EE than subjects who regard themselves as moderately fit (P <0.05). Possible over-reporters reported less time as very light activity (P = 0.007), more time as moderate activity (P = 0.01) and more time as vigorous activity (P = 0.02) than acceptable reporters. Conclusions: Under-reporting of El should always be taken into consideration; however, only a few characteristics of under-reporters are consistent among studies. Misreporting of El was more prevalent than misreporting of EE. The level of physical activity more than the time spent involved in various activities was misreported.

KW - energy intake

KW - misreporting

KW - physical activity

KW - energy expenditure

KW - dietary records

U2 - 10.1017/S136898000724666X

DO - 10.1017/S136898000724666X

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

SP - 230

EP - 237

JO - Public Health Nutrition

JF - Public Health Nutrition

SN - 1368-9800

IS - 3

ER -