Capabilities and Limitations of an Association Theory for Chemicals in Liquid or Supercritical Solvents

Ioannis Tsivintzelis, Georgios Kontogeorgis

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Abstract

The cubic-plus-association (CPA) model is an equation of state (EoS) that combines the Soave–Redlich–Kwong (SRK) equation with the association term from Wertheim’s theory as used in statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT). In the form used here, the CPA EoS does not include separate terms for the polar and quadrupolar contributions. The capabilities and limitations of the CPA model when it is applied to mixtures with nonpolar and polar chemicals, as well as associating (hydrogen-bonding) compounds are illustrated. Three case studies are considered, all of which are of industrial relevance. The capabilities of the model are illustrated in the first two case studies: the phase behavior of mixtures used in the oxidation of 2-octanol in supercritical CO2 and the investigation of systems containing acetone, methanol, water, chloroform, and methyl acetate. In each case, both correlations of vapor–liquid and liquid–liquid equilibria for binary systems and predictions for multicomponent mixtures are presented. Finally, the limitations of the CPA model are illustrated in the last case study, which focuses on the modeling of mixtures containing aromatic acids, such as benzoic and terephthalic acid. We also include a detailed discussion of the capabilities and limitations of the model in context and related to previous investigations. Finally, results are compared to observations from studies with other association models.
Original languageEnglish
JournalIndustrial & Engineering Chemistry Research
Volume51
Issue number41
Pages (from-to)13496-13517
ISSN0888-5885
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Bibliographical note

© 2012 American Chemical Society

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