Can geodemographics be used effectively to improve public service delivery using an example of road traffic safety in London?

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Abstract

Propensity to be involved in a road traffic collision in Greater London depends on many factors, including personal mobility, lifestyle, behaviour, neighbourhood characteristics and environment. This paper addresses the merits of using a spatio temporal approach to the analysis of road traffic collision casualties using post code data of home addresses for drivers and casualties involved. Recently geo-demographic classification has begun to be used with GIS and as a socio-economic tool for both the public and private sector. This research will be using ‘MOSAIC’, geodemographic software from Experian. This study seeks to analyse driver and casualty post code data for road collision in London, over a period of five years from 1998 to March. Results suggest distinct spatial and temporal patterns of geodemographic populations that are more likely to have a high propensity to be involved in a collision either as a casualty or a driver. The results also highlight that certain geodemographic groups have a higher collision involvement propensity at different times of the day. Overall, the study depicts that geodemographics can assist in determining a better understanding of the risks of collision involvement on London’s population.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2005
Number of pages23
Publication statusPublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes
EventComputers in Urban Planning and Urban Management 2005 - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 29 Jun 20051 Jul 2005

Conference

ConferenceComputers in Urban Planning and Urban Management 2005
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period29/06/200501/07/2005

Cite this

Anderson, T. K. (2005). Can geodemographics be used effectively to improve public service delivery using an example of road traffic safety in London?. Paper presented at Computers in Urban Planning and Urban Management 2005, London, United Kingdom.