Brain Image Motion Correction

Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking

Rasmus Ramsbøl Jensen, Claus Benjaminsen, Rasmus Larsen, Oline Vinter Olesen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrial
production lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aided
surgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devices
for motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. In
order to use such devices a geometric calibration with the coordinate system in which the motion has to be used is often required. While most devices report a measuring accuracy and precision, reporting a calibration accuracy is not always straight forward. We set out to do a quantitative measure of the impact of both calibration offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype. The combined data set form a good basis for a quantitative analysis of calibration accuracy and tracking precision on motion corrected medical images and scanner resolution.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationImage Analysis : 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings
Number of pages10
PublisherSpringer Science+Business Media
Publication date2015
Pages159-168
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-19664-0
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-19665-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 15 Jun 201517 Jun 2015
Conference number: 19
http://www.scia2015.org/

Conference

Conference19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis
Number19
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period15/06/201517/06/2015
Internet address
SeriesLecture Notes in Computer Science
ISSN0302-9743

Cite this

Jensen, R. R., Benjaminsen, C., Larsen, R., & Olesen, O. V. (2015). Brain Image Motion Correction: Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking. In Image Analysis: 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings (pp. 159-168). Springer Science+Business Media. Lecture Notes in Computer Science https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19665-7_13
Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl ; Benjaminsen, Claus ; Larsen, Rasmus ; Olesen, Oline Vinter. / Brain Image Motion Correction : Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking. Image Analysis: 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings. Springer Science+Business Media, 2015. pp. 159-168 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science).
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title = "Brain Image Motion Correction: Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking",
abstract = "The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrialproduction lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aidedsurgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devicesfor motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. Inorder to use such devices a geometric calibration with the coordinate system in which the motion has to be used is often required. While most devices report a measuring accuracy and precision, reporting a calibration accuracy is not always straight forward. We set out to do a quantitative measure of the impact of both calibration offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype. The combined data set form a good basis for a quantitative analysis of calibration accuracy and tracking precision on motion corrected medical images and scanner resolution.",
author = "Jensen, {Rasmus Ramsb{\o}l} and Claus Benjaminsen and Rasmus Larsen and Olesen, {Oline Vinter}",
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Jensen, RR, Benjaminsen, C, Larsen, R & Olesen, OV 2015, Brain Image Motion Correction: Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking. in Image Analysis: 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings. Springer Science+Business Media, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, pp. 159-168, 19th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, Copenhagen, Denmark, 15/06/2015. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19665-7_13

Brain Image Motion Correction : Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking. / Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Benjaminsen, Claus; Larsen, Rasmus; Olesen, Oline Vinter.

Image Analysis: 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings. Springer Science+Business Media, 2015. p. 159-168 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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AB - The application of motion tracking is wide, including: industrialproduction lines, motion interaction in gaming, computer-aidedsurgery and motion correction in medical brain imaging. Several devicesfor motion tracking exist using a variety of different methodologies. Inorder to use such devices a geometric calibration with the coordinate system in which the motion has to be used is often required. While most devices report a measuring accuracy and precision, reporting a calibration accuracy is not always straight forward. We set out to do a quantitative measure of the impact of both calibration offset and tracking noise in medical brain imaging. The data are generated from a phantom mounted on a rotary stage and have been collected using a Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph for positron emission tomography. During acquisition the phantom was tracked with our latest tracking prototype. The combined data set form a good basis for a quantitative analysis of calibration accuracy and tracking precision on motion corrected medical images and scanner resolution.

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Jensen RR, Benjaminsen C, Larsen R, Olesen OV. Brain Image Motion Correction: Impact of Incorrect Calibration and Noisy Tracking. In Image Analysis: 19th Scandinavian Conference, SCIA 2015 Copenhagen, Denmark, June 15–17, 2015 Proceedings. Springer Science+Business Media. 2015. p. 159-168. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-19665-7_13