Assessment of the impact of the recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus horsens strain on the reproductive performance in pregnant sows

Sandra Genís, Lise K. Kvisgaard, Lars Erik Larsen, Lucas P. Taylor, Jay G. Calvert, Mònica Balasch*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This study assessed the impact of a PRRSV (porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus) recombinant strain (Horsens strain) on the reproductive performance of naïve pregnant sows in the last third of gestation. Fifteen sows were included: four negative reproductive controls (NTX), five infected with a PRRSV-1 field strain (Olot/91, T01), and six infected with the recombinant PRRSV-1 strain (Horsens strain, T02). Piglets were monitored until weaning. Reproductive performance was the primary variable. In sows, viremia and nasal shedding (T01 and T02 groups), and, in piglets, viral load in blood and in lungs, as well as macroscopic lung lesions (T01 and T02 groups), were the secondary variables. The reproductive performance results were numerically different between the two challenged groups. Moreover, viral loads in blood were 1.83 × 106 ± 9.05 × 106 copies/mL at farrowing, 1.05 × 107 ± 2.21 × 107 copies/mL at weaning from piglets born from T01 animals and 1.64 × 103 ± 7.62 × 103 copies/mL at farrowing, 1.95 × 103 ± 1.17 × 104 copies/mL at weaning from piglets born from T02 sows. Overall, 68.8% of T01 piglets and 38.1% of T02 piglets presented mild lung lesions. In conclusion, the results suggest that Horsens strain is less virulent than the field strain Olot/91 under these experimental conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number772
JournalPathogens
Volume9
Issue number9
Number of pages12
ISSN2076-0817
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • MLV
  • PRRS
  • Recombinant

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