Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health

Elizabeth O'Day, Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Diego A. Oyarzún, Hideyuki Okano, Víctor de Lorenzo, Conrad von Kameke, Habiba Alsafar, Cong Cao, Guo-Qiang Chen, Weizhi Ji, Richard J. Roberts, Mostafa Ronaghi, Karen Yeung, Feng Zhang, Sang Yup Lee*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Patient X: A 67-year-old Caucasian man slips on a patch of ice. He has abrasions to his hands and has sustained significant damage to his hip. At the emergency room, he informs clinicians he takes atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride to treat hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). X-rays reveal a fractured hip, which will require total hip replacement surgery. Biotechnology is a major force poised to help us to live longer and healthier lives. In 2015, the United Nations defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at providing an all-encompassing framework for improving the state of the world (**). Promoting healthy living for all at all ages, is one of the principal objectives. Using the commonplace example described above, we examine how some of the most well-known biotechnologies (genome editing, stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and precision medicine) are able to benefit Patient X today, in 2018 and we also provide perspective on the additional value these same technologies could offer only ∼20 years into the future (Fig. 1). During this ∼20 year gap, both technical challenges as well as ethical, legal and socio-economic questions must be addressed before these technologies can achieve broader impact. Further, as both the successes and the failures will likely have enduring effects on society, responsible oversight of these and other biotechnologies are necessary as science and applications move out of the lab into clinical practice. In the next 20 years biotechnology will undoubtedly transform healthcare but how, when and, in some cases, whether it should, require careful consideration.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1800195
JournalBiotechnology Journal
Volume14
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)11
ISSN1860-6768
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Biotechnology
  • Gene editing
  • Precision mdicine
  • Stem cells
  • Tissue engineering

Cite this

O'Day, Elizabeth ; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia ; Oyarzún, Diego A. ; Okano, Hideyuki ; de Lorenzo, Víctor ; von Kameke, Conrad ; Alsafar, Habiba ; Cao, Cong ; Chen, Guo-Qiang ; Ji, Weizhi ; Roberts, Richard J. ; Ronaghi, Mostafa ; Yeung, Karen ; Zhang, Feng ; Lee, Sang Yup. / Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health. In: Biotechnology Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 1. pp. 11.
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title = "Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health",
abstract = "Patient X: A 67-year-old Caucasian man slips on a patch of ice. He has abrasions to his hands and has sustained significant damage to his hip. At the emergency room, he informs clinicians he takes atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride to treat hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). X-rays reveal a fractured hip, which will require total hip replacement surgery. Biotechnology is a major force poised to help us to live longer and healthier lives. In 2015, the United Nations defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at providing an all-encompassing framework for improving the state of the world (**). Promoting healthy living for all at all ages, is one of the principal objectives. Using the commonplace example described above, we examine how some of the most well-known biotechnologies (genome editing, stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and precision medicine) are able to benefit Patient X today, in 2018 and we also provide perspective on the additional value these same technologies could offer only ∼20 years into the future (Fig. 1). During this ∼20 year gap, both technical challenges as well as ethical, legal and socio-economic questions must be addressed before these technologies can achieve broader impact. Further, as both the successes and the failures will likely have enduring effects on society, responsible oversight of these and other biotechnologies are necessary as science and applications move out of the lab into clinical practice. In the next 20 years biotechnology will undoubtedly transform healthcare but how, when and, in some cases, whether it should, require careful consideration.",
keywords = "Biotechnology, Gene editing, Precision mdicine, Stem cells, Tissue engineering",
author = "Elizabeth O'Day and Leticia Hosta-Rigau and Oyarz{\'u}n, {Diego A.} and Hideyuki Okano and {de Lorenzo}, V{\'i}ctor and {von Kameke}, Conrad and Habiba Alsafar and Cong Cao and Guo-Qiang Chen and Weizhi Ji and Roberts, {Richard J.} and Mostafa Ronaghi and Karen Yeung and Feng Zhang and Lee, {Sang Yup}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1002/biot.201800195",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
pages = "11",
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O'Day, E, Hosta-Rigau, L, Oyarzún, DA, Okano, H, de Lorenzo, V, von Kameke, C, Alsafar, H, Cao, C, Chen, G-Q, Ji, W, Roberts, RJ, Ronaghi, M, Yeung, K, Zhang, F & Lee, SY 2019, 'Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health', Biotechnology Journal, vol. 14, no. 1, e1800195, pp. 11. https://doi.org/10.1002/biot.201800195

Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health. / O'Day, Elizabeth; Hosta-Rigau, Leticia; Oyarzún, Diego A.; Okano, Hideyuki; de Lorenzo, Víctor; von Kameke, Conrad; Alsafar, Habiba; Cao, Cong; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Ji, Weizhi; Roberts, Richard J.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Yeung, Karen; Zhang, Feng; Lee, Sang Yup.

In: Biotechnology Journal, Vol. 14, No. 1, e1800195, 2019, p. 11.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are we there yet? How and when specific biotechnologies will improve human health

AU - O'Day, Elizabeth

AU - Hosta-Rigau, Leticia

AU - Oyarzún, Diego A.

AU - Okano, Hideyuki

AU - de Lorenzo, Víctor

AU - von Kameke, Conrad

AU - Alsafar, Habiba

AU - Cao, Cong

AU - Chen, Guo-Qiang

AU - Ji, Weizhi

AU - Roberts, Richard J.

AU - Ronaghi, Mostafa

AU - Yeung, Karen

AU - Zhang, Feng

AU - Lee, Sang Yup

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Patient X: A 67-year-old Caucasian man slips on a patch of ice. He has abrasions to his hands and has sustained significant damage to his hip. At the emergency room, he informs clinicians he takes atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride to treat hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). X-rays reveal a fractured hip, which will require total hip replacement surgery. Biotechnology is a major force poised to help us to live longer and healthier lives. In 2015, the United Nations defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at providing an all-encompassing framework for improving the state of the world (**). Promoting healthy living for all at all ages, is one of the principal objectives. Using the commonplace example described above, we examine how some of the most well-known biotechnologies (genome editing, stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and precision medicine) are able to benefit Patient X today, in 2018 and we also provide perspective on the additional value these same technologies could offer only ∼20 years into the future (Fig. 1). During this ∼20 year gap, both technical challenges as well as ethical, legal and socio-economic questions must be addressed before these technologies can achieve broader impact. Further, as both the successes and the failures will likely have enduring effects on society, responsible oversight of these and other biotechnologies are necessary as science and applications move out of the lab into clinical practice. In the next 20 years biotechnology will undoubtedly transform healthcare but how, when and, in some cases, whether it should, require careful consideration.

AB - Patient X: A 67-year-old Caucasian man slips on a patch of ice. He has abrasions to his hands and has sustained significant damage to his hip. At the emergency room, he informs clinicians he takes atorvastatin, metformin and glimepiride to treat hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). X-rays reveal a fractured hip, which will require total hip replacement surgery. Biotechnology is a major force poised to help us to live longer and healthier lives. In 2015, the United Nations defined 17 Sustainable Development Goals aimed at providing an all-encompassing framework for improving the state of the world (**). Promoting healthy living for all at all ages, is one of the principal objectives. Using the commonplace example described above, we examine how some of the most well-known biotechnologies (genome editing, stem cell therapy, tissue engineering and precision medicine) are able to benefit Patient X today, in 2018 and we also provide perspective on the additional value these same technologies could offer only ∼20 years into the future (Fig. 1). During this ∼20 year gap, both technical challenges as well as ethical, legal and socio-economic questions must be addressed before these technologies can achieve broader impact. Further, as both the successes and the failures will likely have enduring effects on society, responsible oversight of these and other biotechnologies are necessary as science and applications move out of the lab into clinical practice. In the next 20 years biotechnology will undoubtedly transform healthcare but how, when and, in some cases, whether it should, require careful consideration.

KW - Biotechnology

KW - Gene editing

KW - Precision mdicine

KW - Stem cells

KW - Tissue engineering

U2 - 10.1002/biot.201800195

DO - 10.1002/biot.201800195

M3 - Journal article

VL - 14

SP - 11

JO - Biotechnology Journal

JF - Biotechnology Journal

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