Antibody reactivities to glutamate-rich peptides of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in humans from areas of different malaria endemicity

P.H. Jakobsen, T.G. Theander, L Hvid, S. Morris-Jones, J.B. Jensen, R.A.L. Bayoumi, B.M. Greenwood, I.C. Bygbjerg, Peter M. H. Heegaard

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Synthetic P. falciparum peptides were evaluated as tools in epidemiological investigations of malaria. Plasma IgM and IgG antibody reactivities against synthetic peptides covering sequences of glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) and acidic-basic repeat antigen (ABRA) were measured by ELISA in individuals from malaria-endemic areas of Sudan, Indonesia and The Gambia to study antibody responses to these peptides in donors living in areas of different malaria endemicity. IgG and IgM reactivities to the peptides increased with malaria endemicity, although there were no differences in reactivities to the GLURP peptide between non-exposed donors and donors living in areas of low malaria endemicity. IgG reactivities to the GLURP peptide in Sudanese adults were high one month after treatment in all adults tested, while IgG reactivities to the ABRA peptide were infrequent. IgM responses to the peptides tested were shortlived in most patients. In Gambian children with malaria, IgM reactivities but not IgG antibody reactivities against the ABRA peptide were higher in those with mild malaria than in those with severe malaria. The peptides may be useful in future epidemiological studies, especially in areas of low malaria endemicity.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalActa Pathologica Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica
    Volume104
    Issue number10
    Pages (from-to)734-740
    ISSN0903-4641
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 1996

    Keywords

    • malaria
    • antibodies
    • glutamate-rich protein
    • acidic-basic repeat antigen

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