Antibodies Against Foot-and-mouth Disease (FMD) Virus in African Buffalos (Syncerus caffer) in Selected National Parks in Uganda (2001–2003)

C. Ayebazibwe, F. N. Mwiine, S. N. Balinda, Kirsten Tjørnehøj, C. Masembe, V. B. Muwanika, A. R. A. Okurut, H. R. Siegismund, Søren Alexandersen

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    In East Africa, the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus (FMDV) isolates have over time included serotypes O, A, C, Southern African Territories (SAT) 1 and SAT 2, mainly from livestock. SAT 3 has only been isolated in a few cases and only in African buffalos (Syncerus caffer). To investigate the presence of antibodies against FMDV serotypes in wildlife in Uganda, serological studies were performed on buffalo serum samples collected between 2001 and 2003. Thirty-eight samples from African buffalos collected from Lake Mburo, Kidepo Valley, Murchison Falls and Queen Elizabeth National Parks were screened using Ceditest® FMDV NS to detect antibodies against FMDV non-structural proteins (NSP). The seroprevalence of antibodies against non-structural proteins was 74%. To characterize FMDV antibodies, samples were selected and titrated using serotype-specific solid phase blocking enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). High titres of antibodies (≥1 : 160) against FMDV serotypes SAT 1, SAT 2 and SAT 3 were identified. This study suggests that African buffalos in the different national parks in Uganda may play an important role in the epidemiology of SAT serotypes of FMDV.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalTransboundary and Emerging Diseases
    Volume57
    Issue number4
    Pages (from-to)286-292
    ISSN1865-1674
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • Serotypes
    • African buffalos
    • Seroprevalence
    • Foot-and-mouth disease

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