Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C

Benjamin Zühlsdorf*, Fabian Bühler, Michael Bantle, Brian Elmegaard

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The ambitions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions do inevitably require sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based combustions for supply of process heat to industrial processes. Electricity-driven heat pumps imply the general potential to operate emission free and do thereby represent a sustainable long-term solution for emission free process heat supply.
Currently available heat pump technologies are however limited to supply temperatures of 100 °C to 150 °C, while electric boilers and biomass boilers are often mentioned as alternatives in energy transition strategies. The overall feasibility for heat pump systems in such applications is among others limited by technical component constraints as well as limited  hermodynamic performances, resulting in limited operating performances.
Zühlsdorf et al. [1] have therefore analyzed the possibilities for heat pump-based process heat supply at large capacities and temperatures above 150 °C. They evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two heat pump systems for two case studies. The main results from [1] are summarized by this extended abstract. The article focused on large-scale applications and considered components as known from oil- and gas applications, as these are capable of operating in more challenging conditions and enable exceeding the limitations known from available refrigeration equipment [2]. In addition, the focus was on applications, in which the plant owners have access to electricity at low costs or the possibility to invest in own renewable electricity generators, such as wind farms and photovoltaics, as these are ensuring low levelized cost of electricity [3]. 
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBook of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps
EditorsBenjamin Zühlsdorf, Michael Bantle, Brian Elmegaard
PublisherSINTEF
Publication date2019
Pages26-37
ISBN (Electronic)978-82-594-3781-5
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 9 Sep 20199 Sep 2019

Conference

Conference2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps
CountryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period09/09/201909/09/2019

Keywords

  • High temperature heat pump
  • Electrification
  • Industry
  • Denmark

Cite this

Zühlsdorf, B., Bühler, F., Bantle, M., & Elmegaard, B. (2019). Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C. In B. Zühlsdorf, M. Bantle, & B. Elmegaard (Eds.), Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps (pp. 26-37). SINTEF.
Zühlsdorf, Benjamin ; Bühler, Fabian ; Bantle, Michael ; Elmegaard, Brian. / Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C. Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps. editor / Benjamin Zühlsdorf ; Michael Bantle ; Brian Elmegaard. SINTEF, 2019. pp. 26-37
@inproceedings{03273e44b558465a87afa124a447141d,
title = "Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C",
abstract = "The ambitions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions do inevitably require sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based combustions for supply of process heat to industrial processes. Electricity-driven heat pumps imply the general potential to operate emission free and do thereby represent a sustainable long-term solution for emission free process heat supply.Currently available heat pump technologies are however limited to supply temperatures of 100 °C to 150 °C, while electric boilers and biomass boilers are often mentioned as alternatives in energy transition strategies. The overall feasibility for heat pump systems in such applications is among others limited by technical component constraints as well as limited  hermodynamic performances, resulting in limited operating performances.Z{\"u}hlsdorf et al. [1] have therefore analyzed the possibilities for heat pump-based process heat supply at large capacities and temperatures above 150 °C. They evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two heat pump systems for two case studies. The main results from [1] are summarized by this extended abstract. The article focused on large-scale applications and considered components as known from oil- and gas applications, as these are capable of operating in more challenging conditions and enable exceeding the limitations known from available refrigeration equipment [2]. In addition, the focus was on applications, in which the plant owners have access to electricity at low costs or the possibility to invest in own renewable electricity generators, such as wind farms and photovoltaics, as these are ensuring low levelized cost of electricity [3]. ",
keywords = "High temperature heat pump, Electrification, Industry, Denmark",
author = "Benjamin Z{\"u}hlsdorf and Fabian B{\"u}hler and Michael Bantle and Brian Elmegaard",
year = "2019",
language = "English",
pages = "26--37",
editor = "Benjamin Z{\"u}hlsdorf and Bantle, {Michael } and Elmegaard, {Brian }",
booktitle = "Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps",
publisher = "SINTEF",

}

Zühlsdorf, B, Bühler, F, Bantle, M & Elmegaard, B 2019, Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C. in B Zühlsdorf, M Bantle & B Elmegaard (eds), Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps. SINTEF, pp. 26-37, 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps, Copenhagen, Denmark, 09/09/2019.

Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C. / Zühlsdorf, Benjamin; Bühler, Fabian; Bantle, Michael ; Elmegaard, Brian.

Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps. ed. / Benjamin Zühlsdorf; Michael Bantle; Brian Elmegaard. SINTEF, 2019. p. 26-37.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

TY - GEN

T1 - Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C

AU - Zühlsdorf, Benjamin

AU - Bühler, Fabian

AU - Bantle, Michael

AU - Elmegaard, Brian

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The ambitions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions do inevitably require sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based combustions for supply of process heat to industrial processes. Electricity-driven heat pumps imply the general potential to operate emission free and do thereby represent a sustainable long-term solution for emission free process heat supply.Currently available heat pump technologies are however limited to supply temperatures of 100 °C to 150 °C, while electric boilers and biomass boilers are often mentioned as alternatives in energy transition strategies. The overall feasibility for heat pump systems in such applications is among others limited by technical component constraints as well as limited  hermodynamic performances, resulting in limited operating performances.Zühlsdorf et al. [1] have therefore analyzed the possibilities for heat pump-based process heat supply at large capacities and temperatures above 150 °C. They evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two heat pump systems for two case studies. The main results from [1] are summarized by this extended abstract. The article focused on large-scale applications and considered components as known from oil- and gas applications, as these are capable of operating in more challenging conditions and enable exceeding the limitations known from available refrigeration equipment [2]. In addition, the focus was on applications, in which the plant owners have access to electricity at low costs or the possibility to invest in own renewable electricity generators, such as wind farms and photovoltaics, as these are ensuring low levelized cost of electricity [3]. 

AB - The ambitions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions do inevitably require sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based combustions for supply of process heat to industrial processes. Electricity-driven heat pumps imply the general potential to operate emission free and do thereby represent a sustainable long-term solution for emission free process heat supply.Currently available heat pump technologies are however limited to supply temperatures of 100 °C to 150 °C, while electric boilers and biomass boilers are often mentioned as alternatives in energy transition strategies. The overall feasibility for heat pump systems in such applications is among others limited by technical component constraints as well as limited  hermodynamic performances, resulting in limited operating performances.Zühlsdorf et al. [1] have therefore analyzed the possibilities for heat pump-based process heat supply at large capacities and temperatures above 150 °C. They evaluated the technical and economic feasibility of two heat pump systems for two case studies. The main results from [1] are summarized by this extended abstract. The article focused on large-scale applications and considered components as known from oil- and gas applications, as these are capable of operating in more challenging conditions and enable exceeding the limitations known from available refrigeration equipment [2]. In addition, the focus was on applications, in which the plant owners have access to electricity at low costs or the possibility to invest in own renewable electricity generators, such as wind farms and photovoltaics, as these are ensuring low levelized cost of electricity [3]. 

KW - High temperature heat pump

KW - Electrification

KW - Industry

KW - Denmark

M3 - Article in proceedings

SP - 26

EP - 37

BT - Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps

A2 - Zühlsdorf, Benjamin

A2 - Bantle, Michael

A2 - Elmegaard, Brian

PB - SINTEF

ER -

Zühlsdorf B, Bühler F, Bantle M, Elmegaard B. Analysis of technologies and potentials for heat pump-based process heat supply above 150 °C. In Zühlsdorf B, Bantle M, Elmegaard B, editors, Book of presentations of the 2nd Symposium on High-Temperature Heat Pumps. SINTEF. 2019. p. 26-37