An experimental investigation of the corrosive influence of SO 2 relative to H 2 SO 4 of marine engine cylinder liners

Lars Kjemtrup, Rasmus F. Cordtz*, Michael V. Jensen, Jesper Schramm

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The present study investigates the corrosive influence of SO2 on cylinder liner wear relative to H2SO4. Several charge gases with different concentrations of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in air are fed to a motored light duty test engine that operates at 98 revolutions per minute (rpm) in order to resemble the corrosive combustion gas and cycle speed of large low‐speed two‐stroke marine engines. When the trapped cylinder gas is compressed, the H2SO4 and H2O vapours can condense on the oil wetted liner surface, and the SO2 can be absorbed in the oil film. Hereby the liner surface may be exposed to a corrosive attack. A blend of a base oil and a commercial marine engine cylinder lubrication oil is used in the experiments. During testing, oil samples are extracted from the engine and subsequently analysed for iron and sulphur accumulation (using an energy dispersive X‐ray fluorescence spectrometer) in order to couple cylinder liner wear with the amount of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in the charge gas. In contrast to H2SO4, the wear of SO2 is weak (if any), although the SO2 accumulates/reacts considerably in the lube oil. The highest wear rates are found at elevated H2O concentrations.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLubrication Science
ISSN0954-0075
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • SO2/H2SO4 Corrosion
  • Cylinder Liner Wear
  • Marine Engine
  • Lube oil

Cite this

@article{13c8f0d58b124d3488b1d56ff5d792bf,
title = "An experimental investigation of the corrosive influence of SO 2 relative to H 2 SO 4 of marine engine cylinder liners",
abstract = "The present study investigates the corrosive influence of SO2 on cylinder liner wear relative to H2SO4. Several charge gases with different concentrations of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in air are fed to a motored light duty test engine that operates at 98 revolutions per minute (rpm) in order to resemble the corrosive combustion gas and cycle speed of large low‐speed two‐stroke marine engines. When the trapped cylinder gas is compressed, the H2SO4 and H2O vapours can condense on the oil wetted liner surface, and the SO2 can be absorbed in the oil film. Hereby the liner surface may be exposed to a corrosive attack. A blend of a base oil and a commercial marine engine cylinder lubrication oil is used in the experiments. During testing, oil samples are extracted from the engine and subsequently analysed for iron and sulphur accumulation (using an energy dispersive X‐ray fluorescence spectrometer) in order to couple cylinder liner wear with the amount of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in the charge gas. In contrast to H2SO4, the wear of SO2 is weak (if any), although the SO2 accumulates/reacts considerably in the lube oil. The highest wear rates are found at elevated H2O concentrations.",
keywords = "SO2/H2SO4 Corrosion, Cylinder Liner Wear, Marine Engine, Lube oil",
author = "Lars Kjemtrup and Cordtz, {Rasmus F.} and Jensen, {Michael V.} and Jesper Schramm",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1002/ls.1492",
language = "English",
journal = "Lubrication Science",
issn = "0954-0075",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An experimental investigation of the corrosive influence of SO 2 relative to H 2 SO 4 of marine engine cylinder liners

AU - Kjemtrup, Lars

AU - Cordtz, Rasmus F.

AU - Jensen, Michael V.

AU - Schramm, Jesper

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - The present study investigates the corrosive influence of SO2 on cylinder liner wear relative to H2SO4. Several charge gases with different concentrations of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in air are fed to a motored light duty test engine that operates at 98 revolutions per minute (rpm) in order to resemble the corrosive combustion gas and cycle speed of large low‐speed two‐stroke marine engines. When the trapped cylinder gas is compressed, the H2SO4 and H2O vapours can condense on the oil wetted liner surface, and the SO2 can be absorbed in the oil film. Hereby the liner surface may be exposed to a corrosive attack. A blend of a base oil and a commercial marine engine cylinder lubrication oil is used in the experiments. During testing, oil samples are extracted from the engine and subsequently analysed for iron and sulphur accumulation (using an energy dispersive X‐ray fluorescence spectrometer) in order to couple cylinder liner wear with the amount of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in the charge gas. In contrast to H2SO4, the wear of SO2 is weak (if any), although the SO2 accumulates/reacts considerably in the lube oil. The highest wear rates are found at elevated H2O concentrations.

AB - The present study investigates the corrosive influence of SO2 on cylinder liner wear relative to H2SO4. Several charge gases with different concentrations of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in air are fed to a motored light duty test engine that operates at 98 revolutions per minute (rpm) in order to resemble the corrosive combustion gas and cycle speed of large low‐speed two‐stroke marine engines. When the trapped cylinder gas is compressed, the H2SO4 and H2O vapours can condense on the oil wetted liner surface, and the SO2 can be absorbed in the oil film. Hereby the liner surface may be exposed to a corrosive attack. A blend of a base oil and a commercial marine engine cylinder lubrication oil is used in the experiments. During testing, oil samples are extracted from the engine and subsequently analysed for iron and sulphur accumulation (using an energy dispersive X‐ray fluorescence spectrometer) in order to couple cylinder liner wear with the amount of SO2, H2SO4, and H2O in the charge gas. In contrast to H2SO4, the wear of SO2 is weak (if any), although the SO2 accumulates/reacts considerably in the lube oil. The highest wear rates are found at elevated H2O concentrations.

KW - SO2/H2SO4 Corrosion

KW - Cylinder Liner Wear

KW - Marine Engine

KW - Lube oil

U2 - 10.1002/ls.1492

DO - 10.1002/ls.1492

M3 - Journal article

JO - Lubrication Science

JF - Lubrication Science

SN - 0954-0075

ER -