An Analytical Solution to the Strain Space Limitation in Asperity Flattening Experiments Combining Normal Loading with Biaxial In-Plane Strains

Maximilian Zwicker*, Niels Bay, Chris V. Nielsen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference abstract in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Friction in metal forming is largely determined by the evolution of the workpiece's surface topography, i.e. by flattening of surface asperities due to normal loading combined with, among others, subsurface strains, sliding and friction. Zwicker et al. [1,2] conducted experiments with model asperities under combined normal loading and a variation of bi-axial in-plane strain conditions on a newly developed test set-up. Both studies could achieve asperity flattening under balanced biaxial stretching and plane strain, but not uni-axial tension. Up to this point the explanation for the limitation of the strain space was merely qualitative, namely the competition of narrowing due to elongation, widening due to normal loading, and a resistance to width change caused by friction between asperities and tool. In this work, an analytical solution based on basic plasticity is presented to further explain the strain space limitation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationExtended Abstract Book of the 9th JSTP International Seminar on Precision Forging
PublisherThe Japan Society for Technology of Plasticity
Publication date2024
Pages55-56
Publication statusPublished - 2024
Event 9th JSTP International Seminar on Precision Forging (ISPF 2024) - Kyoto Terrsa, Kyoto, Japan
Duration: 11 Mar 202414 Mar 2024

Conference

Conference 9th JSTP International Seminar on Precision Forging (ISPF 2024)
LocationKyoto Terrsa
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityKyoto
Period11/03/202414/03/2024

Keywords

  • Sheet forming
  • Asperity flattening
  • Tribology
  • Friction

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