Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration checks for spaceborne instruments like SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP. The measured TBs show unexpected variations like 8-K variation over 240 km on an east-west profile through Concordia, and in certain local cases, a slope of about 0.7 K/km. Comparing the measured TB map with bottom topography reveals a convincing correlation. Simulations show that variations in bedrock topography can indeed modulate the TB appropriately to explain the observed variations. It is concluded that use of the Dome-C area for calibration check of spaceborne radiometers is indeed viable, but with caution-especially when comparing instruments with different spatial resolutions.
Original languageEnglish
JournalI E E E Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing
Volume8
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)3656-3664
ISSN1939-1404
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Antarctica
  • L-band radiometer
  • Radiometer

Cite this

@article{522073dea5cb437fbbe16ec86bc4bd06,
title = "Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica",
abstract = "A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration checks for spaceborne instruments like SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP. The measured TBs show unexpected variations like 8-K variation over 240 km on an east-west profile through Concordia, and in certain local cases, a slope of about 0.7 K/km. Comparing the measured TB map with bottom topography reveals a convincing correlation. Simulations show that variations in bedrock topography can indeed modulate the TB appropriately to explain the observed variations. It is concluded that use of the Dome-C area for calibration check of spaceborne radiometers is indeed viable, but with caution-especially when comparing instruments with different spatial resolutions.",
keywords = "Antarctica, L-band radiometer, Radiometer",
author = "Niels Skou and Kristensen, {Steen Savstrup} and S{\o}bj{\ae}rg, {Sten Schmidl} and Balling, {Jan E.}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1109/JSTARS.2015.2425039",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "3656--3664",
journal = "I E E E Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing",
issn = "1939-1404",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers",
number = "7",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Airborne L-band radiometer mapping of the dome-C area in Antarctica

AU - Skou, Niels

AU - Kristensen, Steen Savstrup

AU - Søbjærg, Sten Schmidl

AU - Balling, Jan E.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration checks for spaceborne instruments like SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP. The measured TBs show unexpected variations like 8-K variation over 240 km on an east-west profile through Concordia, and in certain local cases, a slope of about 0.7 K/km. Comparing the measured TB map with bottom topography reveals a convincing correlation. Simulations show that variations in bedrock topography can indeed modulate the TB appropriately to explain the observed variations. It is concluded that use of the Dome-C area for calibration check of spaceborne radiometers is indeed viable, but with caution-especially when comparing instruments with different spatial resolutions.

AB - A 350 km × 350 km area near the Concordia station on the high plateau of Dome-C in Antarctica has been mapped by an airborne L-band radiometer system. The area was expected to display a rather uniform brightness temperature (TB) close to the yearly mean temperature-well suited for calibration checks for spaceborne instruments like SMOS, Aquarius, and SMAP. The measured TBs show unexpected variations like 8-K variation over 240 km on an east-west profile through Concordia, and in certain local cases, a slope of about 0.7 K/km. Comparing the measured TB map with bottom topography reveals a convincing correlation. Simulations show that variations in bedrock topography can indeed modulate the TB appropriately to explain the observed variations. It is concluded that use of the Dome-C area for calibration check of spaceborne radiometers is indeed viable, but with caution-especially when comparing instruments with different spatial resolutions.

KW - Antarctica

KW - L-band radiometer

KW - Radiometer

U2 - 10.1109/JSTARS.2015.2425039

DO - 10.1109/JSTARS.2015.2425039

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 3656

EP - 3664

JO - I E E E Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing

JF - I E E E Journal of Selected Topics in Applied Earth Observations and Remote Sensing

SN - 1939-1404

IS - 7

ER -