Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot

Lorenzo Vannucci, Silvia Tolu, Egidio Falotico, Paolo Dario, Henrik Hautop Lund, Cecilia Laschi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Two main classes of reflexes relying on the vestibular system are involved in the stabilization of the human gaze: The vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes the head in space and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which stabilizes the visual axis to minimize retinal image motion. The VOR works in conjunction with the opto-kinetic reflex (OKR), which is a visual feedback mechanism for moving the eye at the same speed as the observed scene. Together they keep the image stationary on the retina. In this work we present the first complete model of gaze stabilization based on the coordination of VCR and VOR and OKR. The model, inspired on neuroscientific cerebellar theories, is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. Tests on a simulated humanoid platform confirm the effectiveness of our approach.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2016
Pages25-30
ISBN (Print)978-1-5090-3287-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics - UTown, Singapore, Singapore
Duration: 26 Jun 201629 Jun 2016

Conference

Conference6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics
LocationUTown
CountrySingapore
CitySingapore
Period26/06/201629/06/2016

Keywords

  • stability
  • adaptive control
  • eye
  • gaze tracking
  • humanoid robots
  • medical robotics
  • neuroscientific cerebellar theories
  • adaptive gaze stabilization
  • cerebellar internal models
  • humanoid robot
  • vestibular system
  • human gaze stabilization
  • vestibulocollic reflex
  • VCR
  • vestibulo-ocular reflex
  • VOR
  • visual axis
  • retinal image motion
  • opto-kinetic reflex
  • OKR
  • visual feedback mechanism
  • eye movement
  • Head
  • Adaptation models
  • Video recording
  • Robots
  • Magnetic heads
  • Retina
  • Computational modeling
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Aldehydes
  • Anthropomorphic robots
  • Brain
  • Neurophysiology
  • Robotics
  • Visual communication
  • Humanoid robot
  • Internal models
  • Learning and adaptation
  • Retinal image
  • Vestibular system
  • Vestibulo-ocular reflex
  • Visual feedback
  • Stabilization
  • Biological and medical control systems
  • Stability in control theory
  • Self-adjusting control systems

Cite this

Vannucci, L., Tolu, S., Falotico, E., Dario, P., Lund, H. H., & Laschi, C. (2016). Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot. In Proceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics (pp. 25-30). IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/BIOROB.2016.7523593
Vannucci, Lorenzo ; Tolu, Silvia ; Falotico, Egidio ; Dario, Paolo ; Lund, Henrik Hautop ; Laschi, Cecilia. / Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot. Proceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics. IEEE, 2016. pp. 25-30
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title = "Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot",
abstract = "Two main classes of reflexes relying on the vestibular system are involved in the stabilization of the human gaze: The vestibulocollic reflex (VCR), which stabilizes the head in space and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), which stabilizes the visual axis to minimize retinal image motion. The VOR works in conjunction with the opto-kinetic reflex (OKR), which is a visual feedback mechanism for moving the eye at the same speed as the observed scene. Together they keep the image stationary on the retina. In this work we present the first complete model of gaze stabilization based on the coordination of VCR and VOR and OKR. The model, inspired on neuroscientific cerebellar theories, is provided with learning and adaptation capabilities based on internal models. Tests on a simulated humanoid platform confirm the effectiveness of our approach.",
keywords = "stability, adaptive control, eye, gaze tracking, humanoid robots, medical robotics, neuroscientific cerebellar theories, adaptive gaze stabilization, cerebellar internal models, humanoid robot, vestibular system, human gaze stabilization, vestibulocollic reflex, VCR, vestibulo-ocular reflex, VOR, visual axis, retinal image motion, opto-kinetic reflex, OKR, visual feedback mechanism, eye movement, Head, Adaptation models, Video recording, Robots, Magnetic heads, Retina, Computational modeling, Artificial Intelligence, Biomedical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Aldehydes, Anthropomorphic robots, Brain, Neurophysiology, Robotics, Visual communication, Humanoid robot, Internal models, Learning and adaptation, Retinal image, Vestibular system, Vestibulo-ocular reflex, Visual feedback, Stabilization, Biological and medical control systems, Stability in control theory, Self-adjusting control systems",
author = "Lorenzo Vannucci and Silvia Tolu and Egidio Falotico and Paolo Dario and Lund, {Henrik Hautop} and Cecilia Laschi",
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Vannucci, L, Tolu, S, Falotico, E, Dario, P, Lund, HH & Laschi, C 2016, Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot. in Proceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics. IEEE, pp. 25-30, 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics, Singapore, Singapore, 26/06/2016. https://doi.org/10.1109/BIOROB.2016.7523593

Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot. / Vannucci, Lorenzo; Tolu, Silvia; Falotico, Egidio; Dario, Paolo; Lund, Henrik Hautop ; Laschi, Cecilia.

Proceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics. IEEE, 2016. p. 25-30.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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Vannucci L, Tolu S, Falotico E, Dario P, Lund HH, Laschi C. Adaptive gaze stabilization through cerebellar internal models in a humanoid robot. In Proceedings of the 6th IEEE RAS/EMBS International Conference on Biomedical Robotics and Biomechatronics. IEEE. 2016. p. 25-30 https://doi.org/10.1109/BIOROB.2016.7523593