Adaptive feeding behavior and functional responses in pelagic copepods

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Adaptive feeding behavior and functional responses in pelagic copepods. / Kiørboe, Thomas; Saiz, Enrico; Tiselius, Peter; Andersen, Ken Haste.

In: Limnology and Oceanography, Vol. 63, No. 1, 2018, p. 308-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article – Annual report year: 2018Researchpeer-review

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@article{e28a4358480f4122a8da131eaa50e193,
title = "Adaptive feeding behavior and functional responses in pelagic copepods",
abstract = "Zooplankton may modify their feeding behavior in response to prey availability and presence of predators with implications to populations of both predators and prey. Optimal foraging theory predicts that such responses result in a type II functional response for passive foragers and a type III response for active foragers, with the latter response having a stabilizing effect on prey populations. Here, we test the theoretical predictions and the underlying mechanisms in pelagic copepods that are actively feeding (feeding-current feeders), passively feeding (ambushers), or that can switch between the two feeding modes. In all cases, individual behaviors are consistent with the resulting functional response. Passive ambushing copepods have invariantforaging behavior and a type II functional response, as predicted. When foraging actively, the species with switching capability change its functional response from type II to III and modify its foraging effort in response to prey density and predation risk, also as predicted by theory. The obligate active feeders, however,follow a type II response inconsistent with the theoretical prediction. A survey of the literature similarly finds consistent type II response in ambush feeding copepods, but variable (II or III) responses in active feeders. We examine reasons for why observed behaviors at times deviate from predictions, and discuss the population dynamics and food web implications of the two types of functional responses and their underlying mechanisms",
author = "Thomas Ki{\o}rboe and Enrico Saiz and Peter Tiselius and Andersen, {Ken Haste}",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1002/lno.10632",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "308--321",
journal = "Limnology and Oceanography",
issn = "0024-3590",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adaptive feeding behavior and functional responses in pelagic copepods

AU - Kiørboe, Thomas

AU - Saiz, Enrico

AU - Tiselius, Peter

AU - Andersen, Ken Haste

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Zooplankton may modify their feeding behavior in response to prey availability and presence of predators with implications to populations of both predators and prey. Optimal foraging theory predicts that such responses result in a type II functional response for passive foragers and a type III response for active foragers, with the latter response having a stabilizing effect on prey populations. Here, we test the theoretical predictions and the underlying mechanisms in pelagic copepods that are actively feeding (feeding-current feeders), passively feeding (ambushers), or that can switch between the two feeding modes. In all cases, individual behaviors are consistent with the resulting functional response. Passive ambushing copepods have invariantforaging behavior and a type II functional response, as predicted. When foraging actively, the species with switching capability change its functional response from type II to III and modify its foraging effort in response to prey density and predation risk, also as predicted by theory. The obligate active feeders, however,follow a type II response inconsistent with the theoretical prediction. A survey of the literature similarly finds consistent type II response in ambush feeding copepods, but variable (II or III) responses in active feeders. We examine reasons for why observed behaviors at times deviate from predictions, and discuss the population dynamics and food web implications of the two types of functional responses and their underlying mechanisms

AB - Zooplankton may modify their feeding behavior in response to prey availability and presence of predators with implications to populations of both predators and prey. Optimal foraging theory predicts that such responses result in a type II functional response for passive foragers and a type III response for active foragers, with the latter response having a stabilizing effect on prey populations. Here, we test the theoretical predictions and the underlying mechanisms in pelagic copepods that are actively feeding (feeding-current feeders), passively feeding (ambushers), or that can switch between the two feeding modes. In all cases, individual behaviors are consistent with the resulting functional response. Passive ambushing copepods have invariantforaging behavior and a type II functional response, as predicted. When foraging actively, the species with switching capability change its functional response from type II to III and modify its foraging effort in response to prey density and predation risk, also as predicted by theory. The obligate active feeders, however,follow a type II response inconsistent with the theoretical prediction. A survey of the literature similarly finds consistent type II response in ambush feeding copepods, but variable (II or III) responses in active feeders. We examine reasons for why observed behaviors at times deviate from predictions, and discuss the population dynamics and food web implications of the two types of functional responses and their underlying mechanisms

U2 - 10.1002/lno.10632

DO - 10.1002/lno.10632

M3 - Journal article

VL - 63

SP - 308

EP - 321

JO - Limnology and Oceanography

JF - Limnology and Oceanography

SN - 0024-3590

IS - 1

ER -