Accounting for Uncertainties in Biodiversity Estimations: A New Methodology and Its Application to the Mesopelagic Sound Scattering Layer of the High Arctic

Bent Herrmann, Kristine Cerbule*, Jure Brčić, Eduardo Grimaldo, Maxime Geoffroy, Malin Daase, Jørgen Berge

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Measures of biological diversity (biodiversity) are important for monitoring the state of ecosystems. Several indices and methods are used to describe biodiversity from field observations. Marine faunal biodiversity is often quantified based on analysis of samples collected using a trawl during research surveys. To monitor spatial and temporal changes in biodiversity between surveys, samples are generally collected from a series of stations. Inference regarding changes in biodiversity must account for uncertainties in the estimation of the values for the different biodiversity indices used. Estimation for a single station is affected by spatial-temporal variation in the species composition in the area and by uncertainty due to the finite sample size taken by the trawl. Therefore, variation between stations needs to be accounted for when estimating uncertainty for values of different indices during a survey as total or as mean for the survey. Herein, we present a method based on nested bootstrapping that accounts for uncertainties in the estimation of various indices and which can be used to infer changes in biodiversity. Application of this methodology is demonstrated using data collected in the mesopelagic sound scattering layer in the high Arctic.
Original languageEnglish
Article number775759
JournalFrontiers in Ecology and Evolution
Volume10
Number of pages14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • Uncertainty
  • Sound scattering layer
  • Mesopelagic
  • Bootstrapping
  • Biodiversity indices
  • Arctic

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