Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing

Michael Bevis*, Christopher Harig, Shfaqat A. Khan, Abel Brown, Frederik J. Simons, Michael Willis, Xavier Fettweis, Michiel R van den Broeke, Finn Bo Madsen, Eric Kendrick, Dana J Caccamise, Tonie van Dam, Per Knudsen, Thomas Nylen

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

From early 2003 to mid-2013, the total mass of ice in Greenland declined at a progressively increasing rate. In mid-2013, an abrupt reversal occurred, and very little net ice loss occurred in the next 12-18 months. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and global positioning system (GPS) observations reveal that the spatial patterns of the sustained acceleration and the abrupt deceleration in mass loss are similar. The strongest accelerations tracked the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The negative phase of the NAO enhances summertime warming and insolation while reducing snowfall, especially in west Greenland, driving surface mass balance (SMB) more negative, as illustrated using the regional climate model MAR. The spatial pattern of accelerating mass changes reflects the geography of NAO-driven shifts in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet's sensitivity to that forcing. We infer that southwest Greenland will become a major future contributor to sea level rise.
Original languageEnglish
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume116
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1934-1939
ISSN0027-8424
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Bibliographical note

This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).

Cite this

Bevis, Michael ; Harig, Christopher ; Khan, Shfaqat A. ; Brown, Abel ; Simons, Frederik J. ; Willis, Michael ; Fettweis, Xavier ; van den Broeke, Michiel R ; Madsen, Finn Bo ; Kendrick, Eric ; Caccamise, Dana J ; van Dam, Tonie ; Knudsen, Per ; Nylen, Thomas. / Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2019 ; Vol. 116, No. 6. pp. 1934-1939.
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title = "Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing",
abstract = "From early 2003 to mid-2013, the total mass of ice in Greenland declined at a progressively increasing rate. In mid-2013, an abrupt reversal occurred, and very little net ice loss occurred in the next 12-18 months. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and global positioning system (GPS) observations reveal that the spatial patterns of the sustained acceleration and the abrupt deceleration in mass loss are similar. The strongest accelerations tracked the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The negative phase of the NAO enhances summertime warming and insolation while reducing snowfall, especially in west Greenland, driving surface mass balance (SMB) more negative, as illustrated using the regional climate model MAR. The spatial pattern of accelerating mass changes reflects the geography of NAO-driven shifts in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet's sensitivity to that forcing. We infer that southwest Greenland will become a major future contributor to sea level rise.",
author = "Michael Bevis and Christopher Harig and Khan, {Shfaqat A.} and Abel Brown and Simons, {Frederik J.} and Michael Willis and Xavier Fettweis and {van den Broeke}, {Michiel R} and Madsen, {Finn Bo} and Eric Kendrick and Caccamise, {Dana J} and {van Dam}, Tonie and Per Knudsen and Thomas Nylen",
note = "This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1073/pnas.1806562116",
language = "English",
volume = "116",
pages = "1934--1939",
journal = "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America",
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Bevis, M, Harig, C, Khan, SA, Brown, A, Simons, FJ, Willis, M, Fettweis, X, van den Broeke, MR, Madsen, FB, Kendrick, E, Caccamise, DJ, van Dam, T, Knudsen, P & Nylen, T 2019, 'Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 116, no. 6, pp. 1934-1939. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1806562116

Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing. / Bevis, Michael; Harig, Christopher; Khan, Shfaqat A.; Brown, Abel; Simons, Frederik J.; Willis, Michael; Fettweis, Xavier; van den Broeke, Michiel R; Madsen, Finn Bo; Kendrick, Eric; Caccamise, Dana J; van Dam, Tonie; Knudsen, Per; Nylen, Thomas.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 116, No. 6, 2019, p. 1934-1939.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accelerating changes in ice mass within Greenland, and the ice sheet's sensitivity to atmospheric forcing

AU - Bevis, Michael

AU - Harig, Christopher

AU - Khan, Shfaqat A.

AU - Brown, Abel

AU - Simons, Frederik J.

AU - Willis, Michael

AU - Fettweis, Xavier

AU - van den Broeke, Michiel R

AU - Madsen, Finn Bo

AU - Kendrick, Eric

AU - Caccamise, Dana J

AU - van Dam, Tonie

AU - Knudsen, Per

AU - Nylen, Thomas

N1 - This open access article is distributed under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives License 4.0 (CC BY-NC-ND).

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - From early 2003 to mid-2013, the total mass of ice in Greenland declined at a progressively increasing rate. In mid-2013, an abrupt reversal occurred, and very little net ice loss occurred in the next 12-18 months. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and global positioning system (GPS) observations reveal that the spatial patterns of the sustained acceleration and the abrupt deceleration in mass loss are similar. The strongest accelerations tracked the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The negative phase of the NAO enhances summertime warming and insolation while reducing snowfall, especially in west Greenland, driving surface mass balance (SMB) more negative, as illustrated using the regional climate model MAR. The spatial pattern of accelerating mass changes reflects the geography of NAO-driven shifts in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet's sensitivity to that forcing. We infer that southwest Greenland will become a major future contributor to sea level rise.

AB - From early 2003 to mid-2013, the total mass of ice in Greenland declined at a progressively increasing rate. In mid-2013, an abrupt reversal occurred, and very little net ice loss occurred in the next 12-18 months. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) and global positioning system (GPS) observations reveal that the spatial patterns of the sustained acceleration and the abrupt deceleration in mass loss are similar. The strongest accelerations tracked the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The negative phase of the NAO enhances summertime warming and insolation while reducing snowfall, especially in west Greenland, driving surface mass balance (SMB) more negative, as illustrated using the regional climate model MAR. The spatial pattern of accelerating mass changes reflects the geography of NAO-driven shifts in atmospheric forcing and the ice sheet's sensitivity to that forcing. We infer that southwest Greenland will become a major future contributor to sea level rise.

U2 - 10.1073/pnas.1806562116

DO - 10.1073/pnas.1806562116

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30670639

VL - 116

SP - 1934

EP - 1939

JO - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

JF - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

SN - 0027-8424

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ER -