A Statistical Method for Aggregated Wind Power Plants to Provide Secondary Frequency Control

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Abstract

The increasing penetration of wind power brings significant challenges to power system operators due to the wind’s inherent uncertainty and variability. Traditionally, power plants and more recently demand response have been used to balance the power system. However, the use of wind power as a balancing-power source has also been investigated, especially for wind power dominated power systems such as Denmark. The main drawback is that wind power must be curtailed by setting a lower operating point, in order to offer upward regulation. We propose a statistical approach to reduce wind power curtailment for aggregated wind power plants providing secondary frequency control (SFC) to the power system. By using historical SFC signals and wind speed data, we calculate metrics for the reserve provision error as a function of the scheduled wind power. We show that wind curtailment can be significantly reduced compared to a robust and conservative scheduling, by appropriately choosing a higher operating point based on the error’s expected value and the service error requirement.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of 16th Wind Integration Workshop
Number of pages5
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2017
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Event16th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants - Berlin, Germany
Duration: 25 Oct 201727 Oct 2017

Conference

Conference16th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power into Power Systems as well as on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Power Plants
CountryGermany
CityBerlin
Period25/10/201727/10/2017

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