A high-order finite-difference linear seakeeping solver tool for calculation of added resistance in waves

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Abstract

During recent years a computational strategy has been developed at the Technical University of Denmark for numerical simulation of water wave problems based on the high-order nite-dierence method, [2],[4]. These methods exhibit a linear scaling of the computational eort as the number of grid points increases. This understanding is being applied to develop a tool for predicting the added resistance (drift force) of ships in ocean waves. We expect that the optimal scaling properties of this solver will allow us to make a convincing demonstration of convergence of the added resistance calculations based on both near-eld and far-eld methods. The solver has been written inside a C++ library known as Overture [3], which can be used to solve partial dierential equations on overlapping grids based on the high-order nite-dierence method. The resulting code is able to solve, in the time domain, the linearised potential ow forward-speed hydrodynamic problems; namely the steady, radiation and diraction problems. The near-eld formulation of the wave drift force has also been implemented, and development is under way to include far-eld methods. This paper presents validation results based on analytical solutions for exact geometries.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2015
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event30th International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies - Bristol, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Apr 201515 Apr 2015
Conference number: 30
http://www.maths.bris.ac.uk/~marp/iwwwfb-2015/

Workshop

Workshop30th International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies
Number30
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBristol
Period12/04/201515/04/2015
Internet address

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