A fluoride-responsive genetic circuit enables in vivo biofluorination in engineered Pseudomonas putida

Patricia Calero, Daniel Christoph Volke, Phillip T Lowe, Charlotte Held Gotfredsen, David O'Hagan, Pablo Ivan Nikel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

20 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Fluorine is a key element in the synthesis of molecules broadly used in medicine, agriculture and materials. Addition of fluorine to organic structures represents a unique strategy for tuning molecular properties, yet this atom is rarely found in Nature and approaches to integrate fluorometabolites into the biochemistry of living cells are scarce. In this work, synthetic gene circuits for organofluorine biosynthesis are implemented in the platform bacterium Pseudomonas putida. By harnessing fluoride-responsive riboswitches and the orthogonal T7 RNA polymerase, biochemical reactions needed for in vivo biofluorination are wired to the presence of fluoride (i.e. circumventing the need of feeding expensive additives). Biosynthesis of fluoronucleotides and fluorosugars in engineered P. putida is demonstrated with mineral fluoride both as only fluorine source (i.e. substrate of the pathway) and as inducer of the synthetic circuit. This approach expands the chemical landscape of cell factories by providing alternative biosynthetic strategies towards fluorinated building-blocks.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5045
JournalNature Communications
Volume11
Issue number1
Number of pages11
ISSN2041-1723
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A fluoride-responsive genetic circuit enables in vivo biofluorination in engineered Pseudomonas putida'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this