A cross-language study of compensatory response to formant-shifted feedback. Program abstracts of the 157th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America

Takashi Mitsuya, Ewen MacDonald, David W. Purcell, Kevin G. Munhall

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Abstract

Previous experiments in speech motor learning have demonstrated that the perception of our own voice while we speak plays a role in the control of fundamental and formant frequencies and vocal amplitude. When feedback is changed in real time, subjects alter speech production in attempt to compensate for the perturbation. By testing Japanese talkers in their native and a less familiar language (as well as English‐speaking controls), we examine how this perception‐production process is influenced by language. In the first study, native Japanese speakers produced an English word with formant‐shifted feedback. In the second experiment, native Japanese speakers produced a Japanese syllable with altered feedback and produced an English word that contained a similar vowel with normal feedback. The results were compared with data from English controls and suggest that the compensatory behavior is not language dependent.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2009
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes
Event157th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Portland, Oregon, United States
Duration: 18 May 200922 May 2009
Conference number: 157

Conference

Conference157th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Number157
CountryUnited States
CityPortland, Oregon
Period18/05/200922/05/2009

Bibliographical note

Speech Workshop: Cross Language Speech Perception and Linguistic Experience: Poster Session A

Cite this

Mitsuya, T., MacDonald, E., Purcell, D. W., & Munhall, K. G. (2009). A cross-language study of compensatory response to formant-shifted feedback. Program abstracts of the 157th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. Poster session presented at 157th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Portland, Oregon, United States.