A comparison of the survival and migration of wild and F1-hatchery-reared brown trout (Salmo trutta) smolts traversing an artificial lake

Michael Schwinn, Henrik Baktoft, Kim Aarestrup, Anders Koed*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Supplementing salmonid populations by stocking is a widely-used method to improve catch or to rehabilitate populations. Though, most studies found that survival and fitness of hatchery-reared salmonids is inferior to wild fish. We compared survival, emigration patterns, migration speed and return rates from the sea of wild and 1-year old F1-hatchery-reared brown trout smolts in a Danish lowland stream that contains an artificial lake using passive integrated transponder telemetry in the years 2011–2013 and 2016. The majority of hatchery-reared smolts descended within 72 h after their release, whereas wild fish migration was mainly triggered by increased water discharge. Increased probability of a successful lake passage was found at higher discharge. Within years, the groups differed in lake passage time, but without a significant overall difference. Overall, there was no difference in lake survival (wild: 30%, hatchery-reared: 32%) between the two groups, but survival differed between years. Only a single fish (0.9%) of the hatchery-reared smolts tagged in 2011–2013 returned from the sea compared to 11 (6.4%) wild smolts tagged in that period, which questions the value of supplementary stocking of smolts for conservation purposes.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFisheries Research
Volume196
Pages (from-to)47-55
ISSN0165-7836
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Artificial lake
  • Hatchery fish
  • Migration
  • Passive integrated transponder
  • Survival

Cite this

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title = "A comparison of the survival and migration of wild and F1-hatchery-reared brown trout (Salmo trutta) smolts traversing an artificial lake",
abstract = "Supplementing salmonid populations by stocking is a widely-used method to improve catch or to rehabilitate populations. Though, most studies found that survival and fitness of hatchery-reared salmonids is inferior to wild fish. We compared survival, emigration patterns, migration speed and return rates from the sea of wild and 1-year old F1-hatchery-reared brown trout smolts in a Danish lowland stream that contains an artificial lake using passive integrated transponder telemetry in the years 2011–2013 and 2016. The majority of hatchery-reared smolts descended within 72 h after their release, whereas wild fish migration was mainly triggered by increased water discharge. Increased probability of a successful lake passage was found at higher discharge. Within years, the groups differed in lake passage time, but without a significant overall difference. Overall, there was no difference in lake survival (wild: 30{\%}, hatchery-reared: 32{\%}) between the two groups, but survival differed between years. Only a single fish (0.9{\%}) of the hatchery-reared smolts tagged in 2011–2013 returned from the sea compared to 11 (6.4{\%}) wild smolts tagged in that period, which questions the value of supplementary stocking of smolts for conservation purposes.",
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A comparison of the survival and migration of wild and F1-hatchery-reared brown trout (Salmo trutta) smolts traversing an artificial lake. / Schwinn, Michael; Baktoft, Henrik; Aarestrup, Kim; Koed, Anders.

In: Fisheries Research, Vol. 196, 01.12.2017, p. 47-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Koed, Anders

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AB - Supplementing salmonid populations by stocking is a widely-used method to improve catch or to rehabilitate populations. Though, most studies found that survival and fitness of hatchery-reared salmonids is inferior to wild fish. We compared survival, emigration patterns, migration speed and return rates from the sea of wild and 1-year old F1-hatchery-reared brown trout smolts in a Danish lowland stream that contains an artificial lake using passive integrated transponder telemetry in the years 2011–2013 and 2016. The majority of hatchery-reared smolts descended within 72 h after their release, whereas wild fish migration was mainly triggered by increased water discharge. Increased probability of a successful lake passage was found at higher discharge. Within years, the groups differed in lake passage time, but without a significant overall difference. Overall, there was no difference in lake survival (wild: 30%, hatchery-reared: 32%) between the two groups, but survival differed between years. Only a single fish (0.9%) of the hatchery-reared smolts tagged in 2011–2013 returned from the sea compared to 11 (6.4%) wild smolts tagged in that period, which questions the value of supplementary stocking of smolts for conservation purposes.

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