A comparative study of Atlantic salmon chilled in refrigerated seawater versus on ice: from whole fish to cold-smoked fillets

Sherry Stephanie Chan*, Bjørn Roth, Flemming Jessen, Trond Løvdal, Anita Nordeng Jakobsen, Jørgen Lerfall

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

13 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Water and salt uptake, and water holding capacity (WHC) of whole gutted Atlantic salmon superchilled at sub-zero temperatures in refrigerated seawater (RSW) were compared to traditional ice storage. Following the entire value chain, the whole salmon was further processed, and fillets were either chilled on ice or dry salted and cold-smoked. Changes in quality parameters including colour, texture, enzyme activity and microbial counts were also analyzed for 3 weeks. Our results showed that when fish were removed from the RSW tank after 4 days and further chilled for 3 days, an overall weight gain of 0.7%, salt uptake of 0.3% and higher WHC were observed. In contrast, ice-stored fish had a total weight loss of 1% and steady salt uptake of 0.1%. After filleting, raw fillets from whole fish initially immersed in RSW had better gaping occurrence, softer texture, lower cathepsin B + L activity but higher microbiological growth. Otherwise, there were no differences in drip loss nor colour (L*a*b*) on both raw and smoked fillets from RSW and iced fish. Storage duration significantly affected quality parameters including drip loss, colour, texture, enzyme activity and microbial counts in raw fillets and drip loss, WHC, redness and yellowness in smoked fillets.
Original languageEnglish
Article number17160
JournalScientific Reports
Volume10
Issue number1
Number of pages12
ISSN2045-2322
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A comparative study of Atlantic salmon chilled in refrigerated seawater versus on ice: from whole fish to cold-smoked fillets'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this