A case study of wind farm effects using two wake parameterizations in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (V3.7.1) in the presence of low-level jets

Xiaoli G. Larsen*, Jana Fischereit

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

While the wind farm parameterization by Fitch et al. (2012) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been used and evaluated frequently, the explicit wake parameterization (EWP) by Volker et al. (2015) is less well explored. The openly available high-frequency flight measurements from Barfuss et al. (2019a) provide an opportunity to directly compare the simulation results from the EWP and Fitch scheme with in situ measurements. In doing so, this study aims to complement the recent study by Siedersleben et al. (2020) by (1) comparing the EWP and Fitch schemes in terms of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and velocity deficit, together with FINO 1 measurements and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data, and (2) exploring the interactions of the wind farm with low-level jets (LLJs). This is done using a bug-fixed WRF version that includes the correct TKE advection, following Archer et al. (2020). Both the Fitch and the EWP schemes can capture the mean wind field in the presence of the wind farm consistently and well. TKE in the EWP scheme is significantly under-estimated, suggesting that an explicit turbine-induced TKE source should be included in addition to the implicit source from shear. The value of the correction factor for turbine-induced TKE generation in the Fitch scheme has a significant impact on the simulation results. The position of the LLJ nose and the shear beneath the jet nose are modified by the presence of wind farms.
Original languageEnglish
JournalGeoscientific Model Development
Volume14
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)3141-3158
Number of pages18
ISSN1991-959X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

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