50-Hz plasma treatment of glass fibre reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation

Yukihiro Kusano, Kion Norrman, Shailendra Vikram Singh, Frank Leipold, P. Morgen, A. Bardenshtein, N. Krebs

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Abstract

Glass fibre reinforced polyester (GFRP) plates are treated using a 50-Hz dielectric barrier discharge at peak-to-peak voltage of 30 kV in helium at atmospheric pressure with and without ultrasonic
irradiation to study adhesion improvement. The ultrasonic waves at the fundamental frequency of around 30 kHz with the sound pressure level of approximately 155 dB were introduced vertically to the GFRP surface through a cylindrical waveguide. The polar component of the surface energy was almost unchanged after the plasma treatment without ultrasonic irradiation, but drastically increased
approximately from 20 mJ m-2 up to 80 mJ m-2 with ultrasonic irradiation. The plasma treatment with ultrasonic irradiation also introduced oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups at the GFRP surface. These changes would improve the adhesion properties of the GFRP plates.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 30th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases
Number of pages4
PublisherQueen's University Belfast
Publication date2011
PagesD13
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event30th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases - Belfast, United Kingdom
Duration: 28 Aug 20112 Sep 2011
Conference number: 30

Conference

Conference30th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases
Number30
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBelfast
Period28/08/201102/09/2011

Cite this

Kusano, Y., Norrman, K., Singh, S. V., Leipold, F., Morgen, P., Bardenshtein, A., & Krebs, N. (2011). 50-Hz plasma treatment of glass fibre reinforced polyester at atmospheric pressure enhanced by ultrasonic irradiation. In Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases (pp. D13). Queen's University Belfast.