3D Printed Calibration Micro-phantoms for Validation of Super-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging

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Abstract

This study evaluates the use of 3D printed phantoms for super-resolution ultrasound imaging (SRI) algorithm calibration. Stereolithography is used for printing calibration phantoms containing eight randomly placed scatterers of nominal size 205 µm × 205 µm × 200 µm. The purpose is to provide a stable reference for validating new ultrasonic imaging techniques such as SRI. SRI algorithm calibration is demonstrated by imaging a phantom using a λ/2 pitch 3 MHz 62+62 row-column addressed (RCA) ultrasound probe. As the imaging wavelength is larger than the dimensions of the scatterers, they will appear as single point spread functions in the generated volumes. The scatterers are placed with a minimum separation of 3 mm to avoid overlap of the point spread functions of the scatterers. 640 volumes containing the phantom features are generated, with an intervolume uniaxial movement of 12.5 µm, emulating a flow velocity of 2 mm/s at a volume frequency of 160 Hz. A superresolution pipeline is applied to the obtained volumes to localise the positions of the scatterers and track them across the 640 volumes. The standard deviation of the variation in the scatterer positions along each track is used as an estimate of the precision of the super-resolution algorithm, and was found to be between the two limiting estimates of (x, y, z) = (17.7, 27.6, 9.5) µm and (x, y, z) = (17.3, 19.3, 8.7) µm. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of 3D printed phantoms for determining the precision of super-resolution algorithms.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonic Symposium 2019
PublisherIEEE
Publication date2019
Pages1212-1215
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-7281-4596-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Event2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium - SEC Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Oct 20199 Oct 2019
http://attend.ieee.org/ius-2019/

Conference

Conference2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium
LocationSEC Glasgow
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period06/10/201909/10/2019
Internet address

Cite this

@inproceedings{cda03038b0704ada9d9c284c82dfe273,
title = "3D Printed Calibration Micro-phantoms for Validation of Super-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging",
abstract = "This study evaluates the use of 3D printed phantoms for super-resolution ultrasound imaging (SRI) algorithm calibration. Stereolithography is used for printing calibration phantoms containing eight randomly placed scatterers of nominal size 205 µm × 205 µm × 200 µm. The purpose is to provide a stable reference for validating new ultrasonic imaging techniques such as SRI. SRI algorithm calibration is demonstrated by imaging a phantom using a λ/2 pitch 3 MHz 62+62 row-column addressed (RCA) ultrasound probe. As the imaging wavelength is larger than the dimensions of the scatterers, they will appear as single point spread functions in the generated volumes. The scatterers are placed with a minimum separation of 3 mm to avoid overlap of the point spread functions of the scatterers. 640 volumes containing the phantom features are generated, with an intervolume uniaxial movement of 12.5 µm, emulating a flow velocity of 2 mm/s at a volume frequency of 160 Hz. A superresolution pipeline is applied to the obtained volumes to localise the positions of the scatterers and track them across the 640 volumes. The standard deviation of the variation in the scatterer positions along each track is used as an estimate of the precision of the super-resolution algorithm, and was found to be between the two limiting estimates of (x, y, z) = (17.7, 27.6, 9.5) µm and (x, y, z) = (17.3, 19.3, 8.7) µm. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of 3D printed phantoms for determining the precision of super-resolution algorithms.",
author = "Ommen, {Martin Lind} and Mikkel Schou and Christopher Beers and Jensen, {J{\o}rgen Arendt} and Larsen, {Niels Bent} and Thomsen, {Erik Vilain}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1109/ULTSYM.2019.8926292",
language = "English",
pages = "1212--1215",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonic Symposium 2019",
publisher = "IEEE",
address = "United States",

}

Ommen, ML, Schou, M, Beers, C, Jensen, JA, Larsen, NB & Thomsen, EV 2019, 3D Printed Calibration Micro-phantoms for Validation of Super-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging. in Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonic Symposium 2019. IEEE, pp. 1212-1215, 2019 IEEE International Ultrasonics Symposium, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 06/10/2019. https://doi.org/10.1109/ULTSYM.2019.8926292

3D Printed Calibration Micro-phantoms for Validation of Super-Resolution Ultrasound Imaging. / Ommen, Martin Lind; Schou, Mikkel; Beers, Christopher; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Larsen, Niels Bent; Thomsen, Erik Vilain.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonic Symposium 2019. IEEE, 2019. p. 1212-1215.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingArticle in proceedingsResearchpeer-review

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AU - Larsen, Niels Bent

AU - Thomsen, Erik Vilain

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N2 - This study evaluates the use of 3D printed phantoms for super-resolution ultrasound imaging (SRI) algorithm calibration. Stereolithography is used for printing calibration phantoms containing eight randomly placed scatterers of nominal size 205 µm × 205 µm × 200 µm. The purpose is to provide a stable reference for validating new ultrasonic imaging techniques such as SRI. SRI algorithm calibration is demonstrated by imaging a phantom using a λ/2 pitch 3 MHz 62+62 row-column addressed (RCA) ultrasound probe. As the imaging wavelength is larger than the dimensions of the scatterers, they will appear as single point spread functions in the generated volumes. The scatterers are placed with a minimum separation of 3 mm to avoid overlap of the point spread functions of the scatterers. 640 volumes containing the phantom features are generated, with an intervolume uniaxial movement of 12.5 µm, emulating a flow velocity of 2 mm/s at a volume frequency of 160 Hz. A superresolution pipeline is applied to the obtained volumes to localise the positions of the scatterers and track them across the 640 volumes. The standard deviation of the variation in the scatterer positions along each track is used as an estimate of the precision of the super-resolution algorithm, and was found to be between the two limiting estimates of (x, y, z) = (17.7, 27.6, 9.5) µm and (x, y, z) = (17.3, 19.3, 8.7) µm. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of 3D printed phantoms for determining the precision of super-resolution algorithms.

AB - This study evaluates the use of 3D printed phantoms for super-resolution ultrasound imaging (SRI) algorithm calibration. Stereolithography is used for printing calibration phantoms containing eight randomly placed scatterers of nominal size 205 µm × 205 µm × 200 µm. The purpose is to provide a stable reference for validating new ultrasonic imaging techniques such as SRI. SRI algorithm calibration is demonstrated by imaging a phantom using a λ/2 pitch 3 MHz 62+62 row-column addressed (RCA) ultrasound probe. As the imaging wavelength is larger than the dimensions of the scatterers, they will appear as single point spread functions in the generated volumes. The scatterers are placed with a minimum separation of 3 mm to avoid overlap of the point spread functions of the scatterers. 640 volumes containing the phantom features are generated, with an intervolume uniaxial movement of 12.5 µm, emulating a flow velocity of 2 mm/s at a volume frequency of 160 Hz. A superresolution pipeline is applied to the obtained volumes to localise the positions of the scatterers and track them across the 640 volumes. The standard deviation of the variation in the scatterer positions along each track is used as an estimate of the precision of the super-resolution algorithm, and was found to be between the two limiting estimates of (x, y, z) = (17.7, 27.6, 9.5) µm and (x, y, z) = (17.3, 19.3, 8.7) µm. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of 3D printed phantoms for determining the precision of super-resolution algorithms.

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BT - Proceedings of the IEEE International Ultrasonic Symposium 2019

PB - IEEE

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