Early exposure to CO2 in salmonids: The long-term effects on Atlantic salmon growth and performance in aquaculture (39349)

Project Details

Description

The aim of the project is to determine the mechanisms by which early exposure to CO2 is hindering the long-term production of Atlantic salmon in RAS by testing the following hypotheses:

Hypothesis 1: Osmoregulatory efficiency in saltwater is reduced after exposure to high levels of dissolved CO2 in freshwater. This is the result of poorly developed mitochondrial rich cells (MRC) and/or a reduced number of MRC in the gill/gut epithelium as well as reduced Na+/K+ ATPase activity (i.e. smoltification is incomplete). This leads to increased energetic costs, reduced growth and reduced conversion efficiency.

Hypothesis 2: Aerobic metabolic scope (AMS) is reduced in saltwater after exposure to high levels of CO2 in freshwater. This is due to poor osmoregulatory efficiency and the increased energetic costs associated with maintaining ionic balance. Reduced AMS limits growth by reducing the capacity to deliver oxygen to working cells and produce energy aerobically.

Hypothesis 3: The digestibility of feed is reduced and the physiological costs associated with digestion and protein synthesis are increased in saltwater after exposure to high levels of dissolved CO2 in freshwater. This is the result of poor osmoregulatory efficiency, increased energy costs and a reduced capacity to deliver oxygen to working cells. This leads to poor growth performance, feed conversion and reduced protein accretion rates. The project is in collaboration with Danish Salmon A/S.

Partner
National Institute of Aquatic Resources, DTU Aqua

Funding
The projects is funded by Independent Research Fund Denmark - Technology and Production.

Research area: Aquaculture
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date01/06/201631/05/2018