Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits

Publication: ResearchBook chapter – Annual report year: 2011

Standard

Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits. / Trapp, Stefan; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen.

Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. ed. / F. A. Swartjes. Vol. 9 Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2011. p. 369-408.

Publication: ResearchBook chapter – Annual report year: 2011

Harvard

Trapp, S & Legind, CN 2011, 'Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits'. in FA Swartjes (ed.), Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. vol. 9, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., pp. 369-408.

APA

Trapp, S., & Legind, C. N. (2011). Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits. In F. A. Swartjes (Ed.), Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. (Vol. 9, pp. 369-408). Springer Science+Business Media B.V..

CBE

Trapp S, Legind CN. 2011. Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits. Swartjes FA, editor. In Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. Springer Science+Business Media B.V. pp. 369-408.

MLA

Trapp, Stefan and Charlotte Nielsen Legind "Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits". Swartjes, F. A. (editors). Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. Springer Science+Business Media B.V.2011. 369-408.

Vancouver

Trapp S, Legind CN. Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits. In Swartjes FA, editor, Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. Vol. 9. Springer Science+Business Media B.V.2011. p. 369-408.

Author

Trapp, Stefan; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen / Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits.

Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application. ed. / F. A. Swartjes. Vol. 9 Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2011. p. 369-408.

Publication: ResearchBook chapter – Annual report year: 2011

Bibtex

@inbook{6dfeac9ff5794c6c8f57ae4ef1e7a587,
title = "Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits",
publisher = "Springer Science+Business Media B.V.",
author = "Stefan Trapp and Legind, {Charlotte Nielsen}",
year = "2011",
editor = "Swartjes, {F. A.}",
volume = "9",
isbn = "978-9048197569",
pages = "369-408",
booktitle = "Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits

A1 - Trapp,Stefan

A1 - Legind,Charlotte Nielsen

AU - Trapp,Stefan

AU - Legind,Charlotte Nielsen

PB - Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Contaminants may enter vegetables and fruits by several pathways: by uptake with soil pore water, by diffusion from soil or air, by deposition of soil or airborne particles, or by direct application. The contaminant-specific and plantspecific properties that determine the importance of these pathways are described in this chapter. A variety of models have been developed, specific for crop types and with steady-state or dynamic solutions. Model simulations can identify sensitive properties and relevant processes. Persistent, polar (log KOW <3) and non-volatile (KAW <10–6) contaminants have the highest potential for accumulation from soil, and concentrations in leaves may be several hundred times higher than in soil. However, for most contaminants the accumulation in vegetables or fruits is much lower. Lipophilic (log KOW > 3) contaminants are mainly transported to leaves by attached soil particles, or from air. Volatile contaminants have a low potential for accumulation because they quickly escape to air. Experimental data are listed that support these model predictions, but underline also the high variability of accumulation under field conditions. Plant uptake predictions are uncertain, due to the immense variation in environmental and plant physiological conditions. Uptake of organic contaminants into vegetables and fruits may lead to human health risks, but it may also be used to delineate subsurface plumes and monitor Natural Attenuation. Most models mentioned in this chapter are freely available from the authors.

AB - Contaminants may enter vegetables and fruits by several pathways: by uptake with soil pore water, by diffusion from soil or air, by deposition of soil or airborne particles, or by direct application. The contaminant-specific and plantspecific properties that determine the importance of these pathways are described in this chapter. A variety of models have been developed, specific for crop types and with steady-state or dynamic solutions. Model simulations can identify sensitive properties and relevant processes. Persistent, polar (log KOW <3) and non-volatile (KAW <10–6) contaminants have the highest potential for accumulation from soil, and concentrations in leaves may be several hundred times higher than in soil. However, for most contaminants the accumulation in vegetables or fruits is much lower. Lipophilic (log KOW > 3) contaminants are mainly transported to leaves by attached soil particles, or from air. Volatile contaminants have a low potential for accumulation because they quickly escape to air. Experimental data are listed that support these model predictions, but underline also the high variability of accumulation under field conditions. Plant uptake predictions are uncertain, due to the immense variation in environmental and plant physiological conditions. Uptake of organic contaminants into vegetables and fruits may lead to human health risks, but it may also be used to delineate subsurface plumes and monitor Natural Attenuation. Most models mentioned in this chapter are freely available from the authors.

SN - 978-9048197569

VL - 9

BT - Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application

T2 - Dealing with Contaminated Sites: From Theory towards Practical Application

A2 - Swartjes,F. A.

ED - Swartjes,F. A.

SP - 369

EP - 408

ER -