Uplift and tilting of the Shackleton Range in East Antarctica driven by glacial erosion and normal faulting

Research output: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2017

Documents

DOI

  • Author: Paxman, Guy J. G.

    University of Durham, United Kingdom

  • Author: Jamieson, Stewart S. R.

    University of Durham, United Kingdom

  • Author: Ferraccioli, Fausto

    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

  • Author: Bentley, Michael J.

    University of Durham, United Kingdom

  • Author: Forsberg, René

    Geodynamics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

  • Author: Ross, Neil

    Newcastle University, United Kingdom

  • Author: Watts, Anthony B.

    University of Oxford, United Kingdom

  • Author: Corr, Hugh F. J.

    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

  • Author: Jordan, Tom A.

    British Antarctic Survey, United Kingdom

View graph of relations

Unravelling the long-term evolution of the subglacial landscape of Antarctica is vital for understanding past ice sheet dynamics and stability, particularly in marine-based sectors of the ice sheet. Here we model the evolution of the bedrock topography beneath the Recovery catchment, a sector of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet characterized by fast-flowing ice streams that occupy overdeepened subglacial troughs. We use 3-D flexural models to quantify the effect of erosional unloading and mechanical unloading associated with motion on border faults in driving isostatic bedrock uplift of the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains, which are flanked by the Recovery, Slessor, and Bailey ice streams. Inverse spectral (free-air admittance) and forward modeling of topography and gravity anomaly data allow us to constrain the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere (T-e) in the Shackleton Range region to similar to 20km. Our models indicate that glacial erosion, and the associated isostatic rebound, has driven 40-50% of total peak uplift in the Shackleton Range and Theron Mountains. A further 40-50% can be attributed to motion on normal fault systems of inferred Jurassic and Cretaceous age. Our results indicate that the flexural effects of glacial erosion play a key role in mountain uplift along the East Antarctic margin, augmenting previous findings in the Transantarctic Mountains. The results suggest that at 34Ma, the mountains were lower and the bounding valley floors were close to sea level, which implies that the early ice sheet in this region may have been relatively stable.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research
Volume122
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)2390-2408
ISSN0148-0227
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Bibliographical note

©2017. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 7
Download as:
Download as PDF
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
PDF
Download as HTML
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
HTML
Download as Word
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
Word

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 132029129