Three-Dimensional Whole Body Imaging of Spin Probes in Mice by Time-Domain Radiofrequency Electron Paramagnetic Resonance

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2000

Without internal affiliation

  • Author: Afeworki, M.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: van Dam, G. M.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Devasahayam, N.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Murugesan, R.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Cook, J.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Coffin, D.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    Unknown

  • Author: Mitchell, J. B.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Subramanian, S.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

  • Author: Krishna, M. C.

    National Cancer Institute, United States

View graph of relations

Imaging of stable paramagnetic spin probes in phantom objects and in vivo was evaluated using a RF time domain EPR spectrometer/imager operating at 300 MHz. Projections were collected using static magnetic field gradients and images were reconstructed using filtered back-projection techniques. Results from phantom objects containing approximately 1017 spins of stable paramagnetic probes with single narrow EPR spectra provide three-dimensional spatial images with resolution better than 2 mm. When the spin probe was administered to mice, the spin probe accumulation was temporally observed in the thoracic, abdominal, and pelvic regions. A three-dimensional image (from 144 projections) from a live mouse was collected in 5 min. Using fiducial markers, the spin probe accumulation in organs such as liver, kidney, and bladder could be observed. Differences in the oxygen status between liver and kidney were observed from the EPR images from mice administered with spin probe, by treating the time-domain responses with convolution difference approach, prior to image reconstruction. The results from these studies suggest that, with the use of stable paramagnetic spin probes and time-domain RF EPR, it is possible to perform in vivo imaging on animals and also obtain important spatially resolved physiologic information.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMagnetic Resonance in Medicine
Volume43
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)375-382
ISSN0740-3194
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000
Peer-reviewedYes
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: No match on DOI
Download as:
Download as PDF
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
PDF
Download as HTML
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
HTML
Download as Word
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
Word

ID: 12300774