The use of synthetic and natural vitamin D sources in pig diets to improve meat quality and vitamin D content

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2018

DOI

  • Author: Duffy, Sarah K.

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  • Author: Kelly, Alan K.

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  • Author: Rajauria, Gaurav

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  • Author: Jakobsen, Jette

    Research Group for Bioactives – Analysis and Application, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

  • Author: Clarke, Louise C.

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  • Author: Monahan, Frank J.

    University College Dublin, Ireland

  • Author: Dowling, Kirsten G.

    University College Cork, Ireland

  • Author: Hull, George

    University College Cork, Ireland

  • Author: Galvin, Karen

    University College Cork, Ireland

  • Author: Cashman, Kevin D.

    University College Cork, Ireland

  • Author: Hayes, Aoife

    University College Cork, Ireland

  • Author: O'Doherty, John V.

    University College Dublin, Ireland

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This study investigated the effects of synthetic and natural sources of vitamin D biofortification in pig diets on pork vitamin D activity and pork quality. One hundred and twenty pigs (60 male, 60 female) were assigned to one of four dietary treatments for a 55 d feeding period. The dietary treatments were (1)50 μg vitamin D₃/kg of feed; (2)50 μg of 25-hydroxvitamin D₃/kg of feed (25-OH-D₃); (3)50 μg vitamin D₂/kg of feed; (4)50 μg vitamin D₂-enriched mushrooms/kg of feed (Mushroom D₂). The pigs offered the 25-OH-D₃ diet exhibited the highest (P < 0.001) serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and subsequently exhibited the highest (P < 0.05) Longissimus thoracis (LT) total vitamin D activity. Mushroom D2 and 25-OH-D3 supplementation increased pork antioxidant status. The vitamin D₂-enriched mushrooms improved (P < 0.05) pig performance, carcass weight and LT colour. In conclusion, 25-OH-D₃ is the most successful source for increasing pork vitamin D activity, while Mushroom D2 may be a new avenue to improve animal performance and pork quality.
Original languageEnglish
JournalMeat Science
Volume143
Pages (from-to)60-68
Number of pages9
ISSN0309-1740
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: No match on DOI

    Keywords

  • Antioxidant activity, Pork colour, Pork quality, Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxvitamin D₃, Vitamin D₂-enriched mushroom
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