• Author: Søndergaard, Roar

    Functional organic materials, Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark

  • Author: Makris, Theodoros

    University of Patras, Greece

  • Author: Lianos, Panagiotis

    University of Patras, Greece

  • Author: Manor, Assaf

    Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

  • Author: Katz, Eugene A.

  • Author: Gong, Wei

  • Author: Tuladhar, Sachetan M.

    Imperial College London, United Kingdom

  • Author: Nelson, Jenny

    Imperial College London, United Kingdom

  • Author: Tuomi, Ralf

    Imperial College London, United Kingdom

  • Author: Sommeling, Paul

    Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Netherlands

  • Author: Veenstra, Sjoerd C.

    Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands, Netherlands

  • Author: Rivaton, Agnès

  • Author: Dupuis, Aurélie

  • Author: Teran-Escobar, Gerardo

    Centre d'Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia Laboratory of Nanostructured Materials for Photovoltaic Energy ETSE, Campus UAB, Spain

  • Author: Lira-Cantu, Monica

    Centre d'Investigacio en Nanociencia i Nanotecnologia Laboratory of Nanostructured Materials for Photovoltaic Energy ETSE, Campus UAB, Spain

  • Author: Sapkota, Subarna B.

  • Author: Zimmermann, Birger

    Fraunhofer Gesellschaft, Germany

  • Author: Würfel, Uli

  • Author: Matzarakis, Andreas

    University of Freiburg, Germany

  • Author: Krebs, Frederik C

    Functional organic materials, Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark

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A new encapsulation method for organic solar cells has been tested on flexible solar modules and cells embedded in polyurethane, sandwiched between a tempered glass plate and a polycarbonate plate. Panels, each containing 10 organic solar modules/cells, were fabricated and installed for outdoor exposure in eight different countries for 4½ months. In order to minimize potential deviations in procedures and equipment, one person was responsible for the fabrication, installation and initial and final IV-measurements of the panels using the same equipment for all measurements and calibrations. The encapsulated modules/cells showed significantly reduced degradation compared with previous studies, with final average efficiencies around 40% of the original after 4½ months outdoor exposure. Photodegradation was furthermore found not to be the primary source of degradation.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSolar Energy Materials & Solar Cells
Publication date2012
Volume99
Pages292-300
ISSN0927-0248
DOIs
StatePublished

Bibliographical note

This work was supported by:
– The Danish Strategic Research Council (DSF2104-07-0022)
and EUDP (64009-0050 and 64011-0002).
– The European Commission as part of the Framework 7 ICT
2009 collaborative project HIFLEX (Grant agreement no. 248678), the Dutch Polymer Institute (DPI Project no.678)
and by Agentschap NL within the project OZOFAB (grantno. EOSLT1002).
– AM and EAK a financial support from the European Commis sion’s Seventh Framework Program (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement no.261936.
– The UK Big Lottery Fund/OPAL project for the London pyronometer data.

CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 12

Keywords

  • Encapsulation, Polyurethane, Organic solar cells, Outdoor stability study, Round robin, Inter laboratory study (ILS)
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