The Phoenix galaxy as seen by NuSTAR

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2017

Documents

DOI

  • Author: Masini, A.

    Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy

  • Author: Comastri, A.

    Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy

  • Author: Puccetti, S.

    Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy

  • Author: Baloković, M.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Gandhi, P.

    University of Durham, United Kingdom

  • Author: Guainazzi, M.

    University of Southampton, United Kingdom

  • Author: Bauer, F. E.

    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

  • Author: Boggs, S. E.

    University of California at Berkeley, United States

  • Author: Boorman, P. G.

    University of Southampton, United Kingdom

  • Author: Brightman, M.

    California Institute of Technology, United Kingdom

  • Author: Christensen, Finn Erland

    Astrophysics and Atmospheric Physics, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

  • Author: Craig, W. W.

    University of California at Berkeley, United States

  • Author: Farrah, D.

    Virginia Tech, United States

  • Author: Hailey, C. J.

    Columbia University, United States

  • Author: Harrison, F. A.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Koss, M. J.

    ETH Zurich, Switzerland

  • Author: LaMassa, S. M.

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, United States

  • Author: Ricci, C.

    Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile

  • Author: Stern, D.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Walton, D. J.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Zhang, W. W.

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, United States

View graph of relations

Aims. We study the long-term variability of the well-known Seyfert 2 galaxy Mrk 1210 (also known as UGC 4203, or the Phoenix galaxy). Methods. The source was observed by many X-ray facilities in the last 20 yr. Here we present a NuSTAR observation and put the results in the context of previously published observations. Results. NuSTAR observed Mrk 1210 in 2012 for 15.4 ks. The source showed Compton-thin obscuration similar to that observed by Chandra, Suzaku, BeppoSAX and XMM-Newton over the past two decades, but different from the first observation by ASCA in 1995, in which the active nucleus was caught in a low flux state or was obscured by Compton-thick matter with a reflection-dominated spectrum. Thanks to the high-quality hard X-ray spectrum obtained with NuSTAR and exploiting the long-term spectral coverage spanning 16.9 yr, we can precisely disentangle the transmission and reflection components and put constraints on both the intrinsic long-term variability and hidden nucleus scenarios. In the former case, the distance between the reflector and the source must be at least ∼2 pc, while in the latter the eclipsing cloud may be identified with a water maser-emitting clump.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberA100
JournalAstronomy & Astrophysics
Volume597
Number of pages9
ISSN0004-6361
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 0

    Keywords

  • Galaxies: active, Galaxies: Seyfert, X-rays: galaxies
Download as:
Download as PDF
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
PDF
Download as HTML
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
HTML
Download as Word
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBE/CSEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
Word

ID: 128887598