The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2010

Standard

The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts. / Som, Claudia; Berges, Markus; Chaudhry, Qasim; Dusinska, Maria; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Olsen, Stig Irving; Nowack, Bernd.

In: Toxicology, Vol. 269, No. 2-3, 2010, p. 160-169.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2010

Harvard

Som, C, Berges, M, Chaudhry, Q, Dusinska, M, Fernandes, TF, Olsen, SI & Nowack, B 2010, 'The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts' Toxicology, vol 269, no. 2-3, pp. 160-169., 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

APA

Som, C., Berges, M., Chaudhry, Q., Dusinska, M., Fernandes, T. F., Olsen, S. I., & Nowack, B. (2010). The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts. Toxicology, 269(2-3), 160-169. 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

CBE

Som C, Berges M, Chaudhry Q, Dusinska M, Fernandes TF, Olsen SI, Nowack B. 2010. The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts. Toxicology. 269(2-3):160-169. Available from: 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

MLA

Vancouver

Som C, Berges M, Chaudhry Q, Dusinska M, Fernandes TF, Olsen SI et al. The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts. Toxicology. 2010;269(2-3):160-169. Available from: 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

Author

Som, Claudia; Berges, Markus; Chaudhry, Qasim; Dusinska, Maria; Fernandes, Teresa F.; Olsen, Stig Irving; Nowack, Bernd / The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts.

In: Toxicology, Vol. 269, No. 2-3, 2010, p. 160-169.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2010

Bibtex

@article{aabf725e0b784826a62b3cc703295a87,
title = "The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts",
keywords = "Life cycle concepts, Engineered nanomaterials, Life cycle assessment (LCA), Engineered nanoparticles, Sustainable and responsible innovation, Environment, health and safety (EHS)",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
author = "Claudia Som and Markus Berges and Qasim Chaudhry and Maria Dusinska and Fernandes, {Teresa F.} and Olsen, {Stig Irving} and Bernd Nowack",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012",
volume = "269",
number = "2-3",
pages = "160--169",
journal = "Toxicology",
issn = "0300-483X",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The importance of life cycle concepts for the development of safe nanoproducts

A1 - Som,Claudia

A1 - Berges,Markus

A1 - Chaudhry,Qasim

A1 - Dusinska,Maria

A1 - Fernandes,Teresa F.

A1 - Olsen,Stig Irving

A1 - Nowack,Bernd

AU - Som,Claudia

AU - Berges,Markus

AU - Chaudhry,Qasim

AU - Dusinska,Maria

AU - Fernandes,Teresa F.

AU - Olsen,Stig Irving

AU - Nowack,Bernd

PB - Elsevier Ireland Ltd

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Whilst the global players in industry are rapidly moving forward to take advantage of the new opportunities and prospects offered by nanotechnologies, it is imperative that such developments take place in a safe and sustainable manner. The increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products has raised certain concerns over their safety to human health and the environment. There are currently a number of major uncertainties and knowledge gaps in regard to behavior, chemical and biological interactions and toxicological properties of ENMs. As dealing with these uncertainties will require the generation of new basic knowledge, it is unlikely that they will be resolved in the immediate future. One has to consider the whole life cycle of nanoproducts to ensure that possible impacts can be systematically discovered. For example, life cycle assessment (LCA) – a formalized life cycle concept – may be used to assess the relative environmental sustainability performance of nanoproducts in comparison with their conventional equivalents. Other less formalized life cycle concepts in the framework of prospective technology assessment may uncover further detailed and prospective knowledge for human and environmental exposure to ENMs during the life cycle of nanoproducts. They systematically reveal impacts such as cross product contamination or dissipation of scarce materials among others. The combination of different life cycle concepts with the evolving knowledge from toxicology and risk assessment can mitigate uncertainties and can provide an early basis for informed decision making by the industry and regulators.

AB - Whilst the global players in industry are rapidly moving forward to take advantage of the new opportunities and prospects offered by nanotechnologies, it is imperative that such developments take place in a safe and sustainable manner. The increasing use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in consumer products has raised certain concerns over their safety to human health and the environment. There are currently a number of major uncertainties and knowledge gaps in regard to behavior, chemical and biological interactions and toxicological properties of ENMs. As dealing with these uncertainties will require the generation of new basic knowledge, it is unlikely that they will be resolved in the immediate future. One has to consider the whole life cycle of nanoproducts to ensure that possible impacts can be systematically discovered. For example, life cycle assessment (LCA) – a formalized life cycle concept – may be used to assess the relative environmental sustainability performance of nanoproducts in comparison with their conventional equivalents. Other less formalized life cycle concepts in the framework of prospective technology assessment may uncover further detailed and prospective knowledge for human and environmental exposure to ENMs during the life cycle of nanoproducts. They systematically reveal impacts such as cross product contamination or dissipation of scarce materials among others. The combination of different life cycle concepts with the evolving knowledge from toxicology and risk assessment can mitigate uncertainties and can provide an early basis for informed decision making by the industry and regulators.

KW - Life cycle concepts

KW - Engineered nanomaterials

KW - Life cycle assessment (LCA)

KW - Engineered nanoparticles

KW - Sustainable and responsible innovation

KW - Environment, health and safety (EHS)

U2 - 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

DO - 10.1016/j.tox.2009.12.012

JO - Toxicology

JF - Toxicology

SN - 0300-483X

IS - 2-3

VL - 269

SP - 160

EP - 169

ER -