Prey detection in a cruising copepod

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2011

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Small cruising zooplankton depend on remote prey detection and active prey capture for efficient feeding. Direct, passive interception of prey is inherently very inefficient at low Reynolds numbers because the viscous boundary layer surrounding the approaching predator will push away potential prey. Yet, direct interception has been proposed to explain how rapidly cruising, blind copepods feed on non-motile phytoplankton prey. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for prey detection in a cruising copepod, and describe how motile and non-motile prey are discovered by hydromechanical and tactile or, likely, chemical cues, respectively
Original languageEnglish
JournalBiology Letters
Publication date2012
Volume8
Journal number3
Pages438-441
ISSN1744-9561
DOIs
StatePublished
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 5
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