Pressure-Driven DNA in Nanogroove Arrays: Complex Dynamics Leads to Length- and Topology-Dependent Separation

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2011

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{91576c66fbf04794ae1956eb8759ea1b,
title = "Pressure-Driven DNA in Nanogroove Arrays: Complex Dynamics Leads to Length- and Topology-Dependent Separation",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
author = "Mikkelsen, {Morten Bo Lindholm} and Walter Reisner and Henrik Flyvbjerg and Anders Kristensen",
note = "This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in Nano Letters, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl1044764",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1021/nl1044764",
journal = "Nano Letters",
issn = "1530-6984",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pressure-Driven DNA in Nanogroove Arrays: Complex Dynamics Leads to Length- and Topology-Dependent Separation

A1 - Mikkelsen,Morten Bo Lindholm

A1 - Reisner,Walter

A1 - Flyvbjerg,Henrik

A1 - Kristensen,Anders

AU - Mikkelsen,Morten Bo Lindholm

AU - Reisner,Walter

AU - Flyvbjerg,Henrik

AU - Kristensen,Anders

PB - American Chemical Society

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - The motion of linear and circular DNA molecules is studied under pressure driven buffer flow in a 50 nm slit channel with arrays of transverse 150 nm deep nanogrooves. Transport occurs through two states of propagation unique to this nanogroove geometry, a slow, stepwise groove-to-groove translation called the “sidewinder” and a fast, continuous tumbling across the grooves called the “tumbleweed”. Dynamical transitions between the two states are observed at fixed buffer velocity. Molecules exhibit size- and topology-dependent velocities.

AB - The motion of linear and circular DNA molecules is studied under pressure driven buffer flow in a 50 nm slit channel with arrays of transverse 150 nm deep nanogrooves. Transport occurs through two states of propagation unique to this nanogroove geometry, a slow, stepwise groove-to-groove translation called the “sidewinder” and a fast, continuous tumbling across the grooves called the “tumbleweed”. Dynamical transitions between the two states are observed at fixed buffer velocity. Molecules exhibit size- and topology-dependent velocities.

U2 - 10.1021/nl1044764

DO - 10.1021/nl1044764

JO - Nano Letters

JF - Nano Letters

SN - 1530-6984

ER -