Documents

NullPointerException

View graph of relations

Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in several food borne outbreaks as well as sporadic cases of disease during the last two decades. Increased understanding of the biology of this organism is important in the prevention of food borne listeriosis. This is highly relevant for safety assessment of this organism in food. We have previously shown (Andersen et al., BMC Microbiology; 2007, 7:55) that the environmental conditions to which L. monocytogenes is exposed prior to ingestion are decisive for its in vivo infective potential in the gastrointestinal tract after passage of the gastric barrier. Infection of Caco-2 cells revealed that Listeria cultivated under oxygen-restricted conditions were approximately 100 fold more invasive than similar cultures grown without oxygen restriction. This means that not only the number of Listeria present in a given food item, but that also the physiological condition of these bacteria is important for food safety. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that an oxygen-restricted L. monocytogenes cell represents a significantly higher risk than a cell grown without oxygen restriction. In order to identify transcriptional differences contributing to different invasiveness, microarrray gene chip technology was applied to cDNA created from RNA isolated from oxygen restricted and non-restricted cultures. The analysis confirmed several relevant genes to be differentially transcribed in the two environmental conditions e.g. genes related to virulence potential of Listeria monocytogenes. Quantitative PCR was used to verify the quantitative differences identified with the microarray chip for a selection of relevant and differentially transcribed genes.
Original languageEnglish
Publication date2009
StatePublished

Conference

Conference4th International qPCR Symposium & Industrial Exhibition & Application Workshop
Number4
CountryGermany
CityFreising
Period09/03/0913/03/09
Internet addresshttp://www.qpcr2009.net/
Download as:
Download as PDF
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
PDF
Download as HTML
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
HTML
Download as Word
Select render style:
APAAuthorCBEHarvardMLAStandardVancouverShortLong
Word

Download statistics

No data available

ID: 3560491