Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

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Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry. / Haahr, M. E.; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, K.; Marner, L.; Ratner, C.; Gillings, N.; Baaré, W. F. C.; Knudsen, G. M.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 61, No. 4, 2012, p. 884-888.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

Harvard

Haahr, ME, Rasmussen, PM, Madsen, K, Marner, L, Ratner, C, Gillings, N, Baaré, WFC & Knudsen, GM 2012, 'Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry' NeuroImage, vol 61, no. 4, pp. 884-888., 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050

APA

Haahr, M. E., Rasmussen, P. M., Madsen, K., Marner, L., Ratner, C., Gillings, N., ... Knudsen, G. M. (2012). Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry. NeuroImage, 61(4), 884-888. 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050

CBE

Haahr ME, Rasmussen PM, Madsen K, Marner L, Ratner C, Gillings N, Baaré WFC, Knudsen GM. 2012. Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry. NeuroImage. 61(4):884-888. Available from: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Haahr, M. E.; Rasmussen, Peter Mondrup; Madsen, K.; Marner, L.; Ratner, C.; Gillings, N.; Baaré, W. F. C.; Knudsen, G. M. / Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 61, No. 4, 2012, p. 884-888.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2012

Bibtex

@article{8c470d4a84304ff5bc36ca833d88b1bc,
title = "Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry",
keywords = "PET, Serotonin 4 receptor, Neuroimaging, Obesity, Reward",
publisher = "Academic Press",
author = "Haahr, {M. E.} and Rasmussen, {Peter Mondrup} and K. Madsen and L. Marner and C. Ratner and N. Gillings and Baaré, {W. F. C.} and Knudsen, {G. M.}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050",
volume = "61",
number = "4",
pages = "884--888",
journal = "NeuroImage",
issn = "1053-8119",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity is associated with high serotonin 4 receptor availability in the brain reward circuitry

A1 - Haahr,M. E.

A1 - Rasmussen,Peter Mondrup

A1 - Madsen,K.

A1 - Marner,L.

A1 - Ratner,C.

A1 - Gillings,N.

A1 - Baaré,W. F. C.

A1 - Knudsen,G. M.

AU - Haahr,M. E.

AU - Rasmussen,Peter Mondrup

AU - Madsen,K.

AU - Marner,L.

AU - Ratner,C.

AU - Gillings,N.

AU - Baaré,W. F. C.

AU - Knudsen,G. M.

PB - Academic Press

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - The neurobiology underlying obesity is not fully understood. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is established as a satiety-generating signal, but its rewarding role in feeding is less well elucidated. From animal experiments there is now evidence that the 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) is involved in food intake, and that pharmacological or genetic manipulation of the receptor in reward-related brain areas alters food intake.Here, we used positron emission tomography in humans to examine the association between cerebral 5-HT4Rs and common obesity.We found in humans a strong positive association between body mass index and the 5-HT4R density bilaterally in the two reward ‘hot spots’ nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and additionally in the left hippocampal region and orbitofrontal cortex.These findings suggest that the 5-HT4R is critically involved in reward circuits that regulate people's food intake. They also suggest that pharmacological stimulation of the cerebral 5-HT4R may reduce reward-related overeating in humans.

AB - The neurobiology underlying obesity is not fully understood. The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is established as a satiety-generating signal, but its rewarding role in feeding is less well elucidated. From animal experiments there is now evidence that the 5-HT4 receptor (5-HT4R) is involved in food intake, and that pharmacological or genetic manipulation of the receptor in reward-related brain areas alters food intake.Here, we used positron emission tomography in humans to examine the association between cerebral 5-HT4Rs and common obesity.We found in humans a strong positive association between body mass index and the 5-HT4R density bilaterally in the two reward ‘hot spots’ nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, and additionally in the left hippocampal region and orbitofrontal cortex.These findings suggest that the 5-HT4R is critically involved in reward circuits that regulate people's food intake. They also suggest that pharmacological stimulation of the cerebral 5-HT4R may reduce reward-related overeating in humans.

KW - PET

KW - Serotonin 4 receptor

KW - Neuroimaging

KW - Obesity

KW - Reward

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050

DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.050

JO - NeuroImage

JF - NeuroImage

SN - 1053-8119

IS - 4

VL - 61

SP - 884

EP - 888

ER -