Management-By-Objectives in Healthcare

Publication: ResearchPh.D. thesis – Annual report year: 2011

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Concurrent to the hasty development within the medical, technological and organizational areas of healthcare, new initiatives are continuously implemented to improve quality of delivered care. To evaluate the effect of these initiatives, the application of performance measurement has become common practice for modern healthcare organizations. During the last decade, vast amounts of quality indicators, accreditation audits, satisfaction surveys etc. have become an integrated part of healthcare professionals' daily work. Most of these measurement structures are well documented and well executed; collectively, however, they pose a significant drawback. The vast selection of self-contained initiatives limits the overview for decision makers and imposes an escalating administrative burden on operational staff members. Contrary to the initial objective, the expanding informational burden limits the overview and transparency for healthcare decision makers; as a result, well-documented initiatives fail to become integrated support in operational decision-making processes. This research work has thus striven to design a holistic Management-By-Objectives framework that can enable managers and operational personnel to assess performance in relation to the organizational expectations. The work concludes that by integrating all meaningful indicators into a “Performance Account”, an overview is established without losing the strength of detailed measures. The design of the Performance Account signifies that managers are able to incorporate those indicators they find useful in their department, and thus secure sufficient informational support for the department's decision-making processes. The Performance Account thereby eases the identification of areas suited for corrective actions, and provides the decision maker with a reliable informational foundation. The account has merits in a hectic environment, where the administrative burden consumes important time from the clinical work. The dissertation is composed of five scientific articles, together with a synopsis describing the most vital contributions and conclusions. Two articles have been presented at international scientific conferences, and three articles have been submitted to scientific journals. The papers present the development of the research study and successively describe the proposals. The synopsis describes in detail the scientific approach that has guided the study.
Original languageEnglish
Publication dateSep 2011
Place of publicationKgs. Lyngby
PublisherDTU Management
Number of pages113
ISBN (print)978-87-92706-07-2
StatePublished
NamePhD thesis
Number3.2011
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