Jupiter's interior and deep atmosphere: The initial pole-to-pole passes with the Juno spacecraft

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2017

DOI

  • Author: Bolton, S. J.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Adriani, Alberto

    National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy

  • Author: Adumitroaie, V.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Allison, M.

    NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, United States

  • Author: Anderson, J.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Atreya, S.

    University of Michigan, United States

  • Author: Bloxham, J.

    Harvard University, United States

  • Author: Brown, S.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Connerney, J. E. P.

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, United States

  • Author: DeJong, E.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Folkner, W.M.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Gautier, D.

    Observatoire de Paris, France

  • Author: Grassi, D.

    National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy

  • Author: Gulkis, S.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Guillot, T.

    Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, France

  • Author: Hansen, C.

    Planetary Science Institute, United States

  • Author: Hubbard, W. B.

    University of Arizona, United States

  • Author: Iess, L.

    University of Rome La Sapienza

  • Author: Ingersoll, A.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Janssen, Matty

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Jørgensen, John Leif

    Measurement and Instrumentation Systems, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej, 2800, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark

  • Author: Kaspi, Y.

    Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel

  • Author: Levin, S. M.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Li, C.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Lunine, J.

    Cornell University, United States

  • Author: Miguel, Y.

    Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, France

  • Author: Mura, A.

    National Institute for Astrophysics, Italy

  • Author: Orton, G.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Owen, T.

    University of Hawaii at Manoa, United States

  • Author: Ravine, M. A.

    Malin Space Science Systems, Inc., United States

  • Author: Smith, E.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Steffes, P.

    Georgia Institute of Technology

  • Author: Stone, E.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Stevenson, D. A.

    California Institute of Technology, United States

  • Author: Thorne, R. M.

    University of California at Los Angeles, United States

  • Author: Waite, J.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Durante-Rodriguez, Gonzalo

    University of Rome La Sapienza, Italy

  • Author: Ebert, R. W.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Greathouse, K. T.

    Southwest Research Institute

  • Author: Hue, V.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Parisi, M.

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

  • Author: Szalay, J. R.

    Southwest Research Institute, United States

  • Author: Wilson, H.R.

    University of Colorado Boulder, United States

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On 27 August 2016, the Juno spacecraft acquired science observations of Jupiter, passing less than 5000 kilometers above the equatorial cloud tops. Images of Jupiter's poles show a chaotic scene, unlike Saturn's poles. Microwave sounding reveals weather features at pressures deeper than 100 bars, dominated by an ammonia-rich, narrow low-latitude plume resembling a deeper, wider version of Earth's Hadley cell. Near-infrared mapping reveals the relative humidity within prominent downwelling regions. Juno's measured gravity field differs substantially from the last available estimate and is one order of magnitude more precise. This has implications for the distribution of heavy elements in the interior, including the existence and mass of Jupiter's core. The observed magnetic field exhibits smaller spatial variations than expected, indicative of a rich harmonic content.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScience
Volume356
Issue number6340
Pages (from-to)821-825
ISSN0036-8075
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017
CitationsWeb of Science® Times Cited: 41
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