Investigation of the Anisotropic Behavior of Wood Char Particles during Gasification

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2006

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@article{a8bb0d9a94b54ba3b7fdec221011449b,
title = "Investigation of the Anisotropic Behavior of Wood Char Particles during Gasification",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
author = "Henriksen, {Ulrik Birk} and Claus Hindsgaul and Qvale, {Einar Bjørn} and Fjellerup, {Jan Søren} and Jensen, {Anker Degn}",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1021/ef060140f",
volume = "20",
number = "5",
pages = "2233--2238",
journal = "Energy & Fuels",
issn = "0887-0624",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Investigation of the Anisotropic Behavior of Wood Char Particles during Gasification

A1 - Henriksen,Ulrik Birk

A1 - Hindsgaul,Claus

A1 - Qvale,Einar Bjørn

A1 - Fjellerup,Jan Søren

A1 - Jensen,Anker Degn

AU - Henriksen,Ulrik Birk

AU - Hindsgaul,Claus

AU - Qvale,Einar Bjørn

AU - Fjellerup,Jan Søren

AU - Jensen,Anker Degn

PB - American Chemical Society

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Wood is a strongly anisotropic material, and likewise, the char produced by pyrolysis of wood is characterized by a strong anisotropy. This anisotropic behavior allows relatively easy transport of gas in the longitudinal (L) direction of the wood, but the transport is much less easy in the radial (R) and tangential (T) directions. Despite this, this property has normally not been included in mathematical model descriptions of gasification of thermally thick particles. The present paper describes a study of the influence of the anisotropy on the reactivity of thermally thick char particles during gasification of wood using macro TGA equipment. The char particles, in the form of slabs (approximately 50 × 70 × 10 mm), were produced by pyrolysis of wood slabs that had been cut from the trunk of beech trees. The char slabs were grouped into three categories according to the orientation of the normal to the greater surface of the slabs L, R, or T (see Figure 8). When the smaller surfaces were coated with alumina silicate, the gasification agent could only enter the interior of the slabs through the greater surfaces. Thermally thick char particles from beech and pine reacted more slowly if the gas was transported in the R and T directions than in the L direction. In the reported study, the difference was between 25 and 35%. For lower values of conversion, the difference in reactivity was considerably greater, but for higher values of conversion, the reactivity was almost the same in all directions. For increasing conversion, a considerable cracking was seen and it was concluded that the gasification agent could penetrate through the cracks with an increased reactivity as a result.

AB - Wood is a strongly anisotropic material, and likewise, the char produced by pyrolysis of wood is characterized by a strong anisotropy. This anisotropic behavior allows relatively easy transport of gas in the longitudinal (L) direction of the wood, but the transport is much less easy in the radial (R) and tangential (T) directions. Despite this, this property has normally not been included in mathematical model descriptions of gasification of thermally thick particles. The present paper describes a study of the influence of the anisotropy on the reactivity of thermally thick char particles during gasification of wood using macro TGA equipment. The char particles, in the form of slabs (approximately 50 × 70 × 10 mm), were produced by pyrolysis of wood slabs that had been cut from the trunk of beech trees. The char slabs were grouped into three categories according to the orientation of the normal to the greater surface of the slabs L, R, or T (see Figure 8). When the smaller surfaces were coated with alumina silicate, the gasification agent could only enter the interior of the slabs through the greater surfaces. Thermally thick char particles from beech and pine reacted more slowly if the gas was transported in the R and T directions than in the L direction. In the reported study, the difference was between 25 and 35%. For lower values of conversion, the difference in reactivity was considerably greater, but for higher values of conversion, the reactivity was almost the same in all directions. For increasing conversion, a considerable cracking was seen and it was concluded that the gasification agent could penetrate through the cracks with an increased reactivity as a result.

U2 - 10.1021/ef060140f

DO - 10.1021/ef060140f

JO - Energy & Fuels

JF - Energy & Fuels

SN - 0887-0624

IS - 5

VL - 20

SP - 2233

EP - 2238

ER -