Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography

Publication: Research - peer-reviewArticle in proceedings – Annual report year: 2012

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Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography. / Torras Rosell, Antoni; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador.

InterNoise 2012. 2012.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewArticle in proceedings – Annual report year: 2012

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Torras Rosell, Antoni; Fernandez Grande, Efren; Jacobsen, Finn; Barrera Figueroa, Salvador / Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography.

InterNoise 2012. 2012.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewArticle in proceedings – Annual report year: 2012

Bibtex

@inbook{0e465fcb82d6403bacf852b7cfc998a3,
title = "Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography",
author = "{Torras Rosell}, Antoni and {Fernandez Grande}, Efren and Finn Jacobsen and {Barrera Figueroa}, Salvador",
year = "2012",
booktitle = "InterNoise 2012",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Investigating the use of the acousto-optic effect for acoustic holography

A1 - Torras Rosell,Antoni

A1 - Fernandez Grande,Efren

A1 - Jacobsen,Finn

A1 - Barrera Figueroa,Salvador

AU - Torras Rosell,Antoni

AU - Fernandez Grande,Efren

AU - Jacobsen,Finn

AU - Barrera Figueroa,Salvador

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Recent studies have demonstrated that the acousto-optic effect, that is, the interaction between sound and light, can be used as a means to visualize acoustic fields in the audible frequency range. The changes of density caused by sound waves propagating in air induce phase shifts to a laser beam that travels through the acoustic field. This phenomenon can in practice be captured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), and the pressure distribution of the acoustic field can be reconstructed using tomography. The present work investigates the potential of the acousto-optic effect in acoustic holography. Two different holographic methods are examined for this purpose. One method first reconstructs the hologram plane using acousto-optic tomography and then propagates it using conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH). The other method exploits the so-called Fourier Slice Theorem and bases all the calculations of the holographic algorithm on the Radon transform of the acoustic field. The validity of the proposed methods is examined in a simple study case by means of simulations and preliminary measurements.

AB - Recent studies have demonstrated that the acousto-optic effect, that is, the interaction between sound and light, can be used as a means to visualize acoustic fields in the audible frequency range. The changes of density caused by sound waves propagating in air induce phase shifts to a laser beam that travels through the acoustic field. This phenomenon can in practice be captured with a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV), and the pressure distribution of the acoustic field can be reconstructed using tomography. The present work investigates the potential of the acousto-optic effect in acoustic holography. Two different holographic methods are examined for this purpose. One method first reconstructs the hologram plane using acousto-optic tomography and then propagates it using conventional near-field acoustic holography (NAH). The other method exploits the so-called Fourier Slice Theorem and bases all the calculations of the holographic algorithm on the Radon transform of the acoustic field. The validity of the proposed methods is examined in a simple study case by means of simulations and preliminary measurements.

BT - InterNoise 2012

T2 - InterNoise 2012

ER -