Intake of micronutrients among Danish adult users and non-users of dietary supplements.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal article – Annual report year: 2011

Standard

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{6cc9da5a7bfd4449b0e2cf3cd20b6a64,
title = "Intake of micronutrients among Danish adult users and non-users of dietary supplements.",
keywords = "Food supplements, Vitamins, Adults, Minerals",
publisher = "Co-Action Publishing",
author = "Inge Tetens and Biltoft-Jensen, {Anja Pia} and Camilla Spagner and Tue Christensen and Maj-Britt Gille and Susanne Bügel and Rasmussen, {Lone Banke}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.3402/fnr.v55i0.7153",
volume = "55",
number = "Suppl.",
journal = "Food & Nutrition Research",
issn = "1654-6628",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intake of micronutrients among Danish adult users and non-users of dietary supplements.

A1 - Tetens,Inge

A1 - Biltoft-Jensen,Anja Pia

A1 - Spagner,Camilla

A1 - Christensen,Tue

A1 - Gille,Maj-Britt

A1 - Bügel,Susanne

A1 - Rasmussen,Lone Banke

AU - Tetens,Inge

AU - Biltoft-Jensen,Anja Pia

AU - Spagner,Camilla

AU - Christensen,Tue

AU - Gille,Maj-Britt

AU - Bügel,Susanne

AU - Rasmussen,Lone Banke

PB - Co-Action Publishing

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Objectives: To evaluate the intake of micronutrients from the diet and from supplements in users and non-users of dietary supplements, respectively, in a representative sample of the Danish adult population. A specific objective was to identify the determinants of supplement use. Design: A cross-sectional representative national study of the intake of vitamins and minerals from the diet and from dietary supplements. Method: The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity, 2000-2004. Participants (n=4,479; 53% females) aged 18-75 years gave information about the use of dietary supplements in a personal interview. The quantification of the micronutrient contribution from supplements was estimated from a generic supplement constructed from data on household purchases. Nutrient intakes from the diet were obtained from a self-administered 7-day pre-coded dietary record. Median intakes of total nutrients from the diets of users and non-users of supplements were analysed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Sixty percent of females and 51% of males were users of supplements. With the exception of vitamin D, the intake of micronutrients from the diet was adequate at the group level for all age and gender groups. Among females in the age group 18-49 years, the micronutrient intake from the diet was significantly higher compared with the non-users of dietary supplements. The use of dietary supplements increased with age and with ‘intention to eat healthy.’ Conclusion: Intake of micronutrients from the diet alone was considered adequate for both users and nonusers of dietary supplements. Younger females who were supplement users had a more micronutrient-dense diet compared to non-users.

AB - Objectives: To evaluate the intake of micronutrients from the diet and from supplements in users and non-users of dietary supplements, respectively, in a representative sample of the Danish adult population. A specific objective was to identify the determinants of supplement use. Design: A cross-sectional representative national study of the intake of vitamins and minerals from the diet and from dietary supplements. Method: The Danish National Survey of Dietary Habits and Physical Activity, 2000-2004. Participants (n=4,479; 53% females) aged 18-75 years gave information about the use of dietary supplements in a personal interview. The quantification of the micronutrient contribution from supplements was estimated from a generic supplement constructed from data on household purchases. Nutrient intakes from the diet were obtained from a self-administered 7-day pre-coded dietary record. Median intakes of total nutrients from the diets of users and non-users of supplements were analysed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: Sixty percent of females and 51% of males were users of supplements. With the exception of vitamin D, the intake of micronutrients from the diet was adequate at the group level for all age and gender groups. Among females in the age group 18-49 years, the micronutrient intake from the diet was significantly higher compared with the non-users of dietary supplements. The use of dietary supplements increased with age and with ‘intention to eat healthy.’ Conclusion: Intake of micronutrients from the diet alone was considered adequate for both users and nonusers of dietary supplements. Younger females who were supplement users had a more micronutrient-dense diet compared to non-users.

KW - Food supplements

KW - Vitamins

KW - Adults

KW - Minerals

U2 - 10.3402/fnr.v55i0.7153

DO - 10.3402/fnr.v55i0.7153

JO - Food & Nutrition Research

JF - Food & Nutrition Research

SN - 1654-6628

IS - Suppl.

VL - 55

ER -